Tag: theater

The Hartford Poli’s Baseball Club

The Hartford Poli’s were a semi-professional baseball club formed in 1905 by management and employees of Poli’s Theatre. The vaudeville venue sponsored the team for men between the ages of 18 to 30. Said to be Hartford’s “fastest” club, the Poli’s welcomed major league legends and challenged teams across New England including their main foe, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Company. The owner of Poli’s was Sylvester Z. Poli who operated theaters in Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, Waterbury and other cities throughout the Northeast.

Poli’s Theatre employees form a baseball league, 1905.
Poli’s advertisement, Hartford Courant, 1909.
Hockers Gamerdinger, Hartford Poli’s, 1912.

In their early years, the Harford Poli’s took part in an intercompany loop, the Poli Baseball League. Hartford’s theater team was headed by Manager R.J. Kelly and captain first baseman Fred Jendron. In 1908, the Hartford Poli’s won the league over the New Haven Poli’s in a title game by a score of 18 to 6. The club was presented a championship cup by owner Sylvester Poli himself. Eventually, the Hartford Poli’s would graduate from the Poli Baseball League to become of Connecticut’s top independent teams.

1913 Hartford Poli’s Baseball Club

The Poli’s utility infielder, Curtis Gillette was also superintendent at the Poli Theatre of Hartford. Gillette was raised in New Haven but came to Hartford in 1911 to pursue career opportunities. By 1913, Gillette was appointed manager of the Poli’s and he named first baseman Ed DeVanney team captain. That year, the Poli’s won 26 of their 31 games against teams like the Royals and the Olympias of Hartford and the Pastimes of East Hartford. Gillette led the club to unprecedented success against local opponents and captured multiple amateur state titles.

1914 Hartford Poli’s Baseball Club
Hartford Poli’s, 1914.

As baseball’s popularity skyrocketed in Hartford, the Poli’s became a more serious operation. The club and it’s winning roster served as effective tangible marketing for Poli Theatre. The company scouted the best players in the city. Top pitchers Ed “Smiler” Oppelt and Jack Vannie as well as shortstop Joe Griffin ushered the Poil’s to dozens of lopsided victories throughout Connecticut. Poli home games were held at Colt Park as well as Wethersfield Avenue Grounds.

1915 Hartford Poli’s Baseball Club

In 1915, the Poli Theatre Company constructed a new ballpark in East Hartford named Poli Field. The grounds covered 10 acres and boasted a grandstand stretching from first base to third base. Wire netting behind home plate prevented foul balls from reaching the stands. With a brand new facility and a talented team, the Poli’s were a formidable attraction. Large crowds, tough opponents and baseball’s biggest stars became guests of the Poli’s.

1916 Poli Baseball Club

On Tuesday, October 24, 1916, Detroit Tigers Most Valuable Player, Ty Cobb came to Hartford to face the Poli’s. As a guest star for the New Haven Colonials, Cobb played center field, first base and served as relief pitcher. Cobb had two hits, showed off his speed in a run-down and pitched 3 innings of one-hit ball. He gave up a double to Poli’s catcher, John Muldoon, a future professional who had three hits on the day. Cobb and Colonials shut out the Hartford Poli’s and their guest star, Benny Kauff by a score of 7 to 0. The exhibition delighted a small crowd of 800 fans at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds.

Manager Gillete recruited Benny Kauff of the New York Giants to take on Ty Cobb who made an appearance for the New Haven Colonials, 1916.
Joe Griffin, Shortstop, Hartford Poli’s, 1916.
Babe Clark, Captain and First Baseman, Hartford Poli’s, 1916.
Hartford Courant excerpt, 1917.
Lester Lanning, Outfielder, Hartford Poli’s and Wesleyan University graduate, 1917.
Rex Islieb, Shortstop, Hartford Poli’s Baseball, 1917.
1917 Hartford Poli’s Baseball Club
New York Bloomer Girls take on Hartford Poli’s, 1917.

In mid-September of 1918, the Poli’s welcomed a recent World Series champion to Hartford. The one and only, George Herman “Babe” Ruth of the Boston Red Sox guest starred for the Poli’s in a benefit game. The event raised funds for American troops from Hartford who were fighting overseas in World War I. Ruth arrived to the city amidst cheering fans in the streets. Manager Curtis Gillette of the Poli’s drove the Babe to Hotel Bond on Asylum Street where he was swarmed by reporters. The next day, Ruth joined the Poli’s at Wethersfield Avenue.

1918 Hartford Poli’s Baseball Club with Babe Ruth (back row, third from right).

On Sunday, September 15, 1918, Ruth and the Poli’s opposed the Fisk Red Tops of Chicopee, Massachusetts. While pitching and batting third, he recorded two hits including a double off the “Bull Durham” tobacco sign on the center field wall. Ruth also threw a complete game shutout, allowed 4 hits and led the Poli’s to a 1-0 victory. He beat his Red Sox counterpart, Dutch Leonard who guest starred on the mound for the Red Tops. Another Red Sox teammate, Sam Agnew played catcher for the Poli’s and drove in the game’s only run. Ruth and entertained a Hartford crowd of more than 5,000, and earned $350 for his appearance.

Bill Kopf, Shortstop, Hartford Poli’s, 1918.
New Haven Colonials vs. Hartford Poli’s, 1918.
Al Mamaux, Pitcher, Hartford Poli’s guest star, 1918.
Fisk-Poli Trophy, 1918
Fred Rieger, Pitcher, Hartford Poli’s, 1918.
Joe Briger, Catcher, Hartford Poli’s, 1918.
John “Boggy” Muldoon, Catcher, Hartford Poli’s, 1918.
Hartford Courant excerpt, 1918.
Hartford Courant excerpt, 1918.

A week later, Ruth once again played on a Sunday at the Hartford Grounds (also known as Wethersfield Avenue Grounds and Hartford Baseball Park) for the Poli’s in a doubleheader. In the first game, the Hartford Poli’s went head to head with Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. Five Major Leaguers including Ruth appeared in the games that day. Ruth pitched and hit third in the Poli’s lineup. Even though he pitched well, Ruth was out-dueled by his Red Sox teammate, “Bullet” Joe Bush and Pratt & Whitney won the game by a score of 1 to 0.

Ruth to play at the Hartford Grounds with Poli’s, 1918.

In the second game of the day, Ruth and the Poli’s faced a former Hartford Senator turned New York Yankee, Ray Fisher. Fisher was the headliner for the traveling Fort Slocum team who beat the Poli’s by a score of 4 to 1. Ruth played first base, had a base hit and scored the Poli’s lone run. A crowd of more than 3,000 people were in attendance for this rare occasion; a doubleheader featuring Babe Ruth and the Hartford Poli’s.

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1918.

The following year, Ruth played first base in another game with the Hartford Poli’s. On September 28, 1919 at Poli Field in East Hartford they opposed the New Britain Pioneers. Mayor of Hartford, Richard J. Kinsella threw out the game’s ceremonial first pitch and posed for a photograph with Ruth. The Babe hit two balls over the right field fence but was only allowed one base for each long ball due to a “short porch” ground rule. Earlier that day he had hit a batting practice homer said to be struck over 500 feet. The Poli’s shutout the Pioneers 3 to 0 before a crowd of more than 6,000 fans.

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1919.
Hartford Poli’s vs New Haven Nutmegs, 1919.
Mayor of Hartford, Richard J. Kinsella and Ruth, 1919.

Ruth was persuaded to join the Poli’s once more in 1920. After his first season with the New York Yankees, Ruth starred for the Poli’s against New Departure at Muzzy Field in Bristol, Connecticut. On October 2, 1920, he hit clean-up for the Poli’s, played every position except pitcher and went 4 for 4 with 3 singles and a double. Nonetheless, New Departure shutout the Poli’s 7 to 0 thanks to crafty pitching from Gus Helfrich, a minor league spitballer from the New York State League. Extra trains and trolleys were scheduled to Bristol that Saturday afternoon, allowing 10,000 fans to see Ruth’s final game with the Hartford Poli’s.

Babe Ruth comes to Muzzy Field, 1920.
Ruth Four Hits at Bristol for the Hartford Poli’s, 1920.
Ruth in the Batter’s Box at Muzzy Field, 1920.
Ruth Tagged Out at Muzzy Field, 1920.
Ruth Playing First Base at Muzzy Field, 1920.
Ruth Accepts Honorary Gift at Muzzy Field, 1920.

For more than 15 years, the Hartford Poli’s were a top tier amateur club. By 1920, the club had developed some of the best players in Hartford. They included Rex Islieb, a standout third baseman, Bill Pike, a left-handed ace and Jim O’Leary, a hard-throwing pitcher. The Poli squad eventually disbanded and evolved into another team called the All-Hartfords in 1921 with a similar roster from previous years. Though a century has passed since the Poli’s won local prestige, their contributions culturally significant and a source of entertainment and civic pride.


The Man Behind the Poli’s

Sylvester Zefferino Poli, (December 31, 1858 – May 31, 1937) an Italian immigrant to the United States who became a world famous theatre magnate.

The Hartford Poli’s baseball club was sponsored by Sylvester Zefferino Poli, a theater mogul, vaudeville pioneer and entertainment proprietor. In 1881, Poli was an expert wax sculptor and a first generation Italian immigrant living New York City. His wax figurine business attained massive success which led him to become a major pioneer of vaudeville theaters in the northeastern United States. Poli’s Theatre on Main Street Hartford first opened in 1903. By 1916, he was heralded as the largest individual theater owner in the world. When Poli retired at the age of 70, he had amassed 28 theaters, 3 hotels (including the Savoy in Miami), 500 offices and two building sites.

Poli’s Theatre first opened on Main Street, Hartford, Connecticut in 1903.
Poli’s Stock Company advertisement, Hartford Courant, 1906
The summer home of Sylvester Z. Poli and his family, “Villa Rosa” Woodmont, Connecticut, 1910.
A scene from “The Fortune Hunter” at Poli’s Theatre, 1912.
Poli’s Palace Theatre, Main Street, Hartford, Connecticut, 1914.

In July of 1928, Poli merged his company with Fox New England Theaters. He still retained majority interest when Fox-Poli’s was created. However in May of 1934, Loew’s Theatres purchased Poli’s remaining theaters, which became known as Loew’s-Poli Theaters. Sylvester Poli spent his final years at his summer home, Villa Rosa in the Woodmont section of Milford, Connecticut. The palatial estate was named after his wife Rosa Leverone. Sylvester Z. Poli died on May 31, 1937 at the age of 79 due to pneumonia. Loew’s-Poli Theatre stayed open in Hartford until 1957.

Poli’s Capitol Theatre, Main Street, Hartford, designed by Thomas W. Lamb and opened August 28, 1920.
Fox Poli Theatre, Main Street, Hartford, Connecticut, 1929.
Loews Poli Theatre in the background, 1956.