Tag: senators

When the Washington Senators Came to Hartford

On September 23, 1930, the Washington Senators stepped off the train at Hartford’s Union Station. The Senators were on their way to play the Boston Red Sox in a four game series but not before making a stop in Hartford. The team was led by Hall of Fame inductee, Walter Johnson who had become manager after twenty years as Washington’s consummate pitching ace. The club rested up at Hotel Garde that Tuesday morning before their afternoon game at Bulkeley Stadium.

Opposing the Senators was a team comprised of Eastern League All-Stars. The minor league team was led by player-manager, Billy Gleason, a veteran second basemen from the Springfield club. Gleason invited his teammate Bill “Whitey” Dreesen, the Eastern League leader in hits to Hartford. Other players in the Eastern League lineup included corner outfielder John “Bunny” Roser and pitcher Fred “Cy” Waterman.

Main Street, Hartford, Connecticut, looking south, 1930.

Local sporting goods store owner and the founder of the Hartford Twilight League, Harry N. Anderson was responsible for scheduling the game. Anderson made arrangements with Washington’s owner Clark Griffith. Prices were 75 cents for grandstand seating, 50 cents for bleachers and 25 cents for children. Ticket proceeds would be donated to the Hartford Chapter of Disabled American Veterans. Famous showmen Al Schacht and Nick Altrock were also on hand to perform comedy routines between innings.

However, well-known names and newspaper publicity only brought 800 fans to the stadium. Tuesday afternoon was not a convenient time for fans, and there were economic reasons for the low attendance. Hartford, like most places in America at that time, were in the grips of the Great Depression. When poverty and unemployment skyrocketed, benefit games featuring baseball stars were popular events, but unaffordable for many.

Hartford Courant excerpt, September 21, 1930.

Longtime Hartford umpires, Walter Elliot and John “Boggy” Muldoon worked the exhibition at Bulkeley Stadium. First pitch was set for 4:15 PM. In the heart of the batting order for Washington were: right fielder Sam Rice, left fielder Heinie Manush and shortstop Joe Cronin (all of which later inducted into the Hall of Fame). The Senators were one of the most revered hitting clubs in all of baseball.

Although it was the minor leaguers who took an early lead. Whitey Dreesen connected for a grand slam in the fourth inning. The game only lasted eight innings to allow the Senators to catch a train to Boston. Neil Dougherty and Billy Gleason each had two knocks on the day. The Eastern Leaguers won the game 9-8 thanks to a smoky RBI single by Jonathan “Mandy” Brooks.

Unfortunately, Walter Johnson did not make an appearance at the game. The reason for his absence remains unknown. Perhaps Johnson was sick or maybe he was focused on Washington’s remaining American League schedule. By the end of September, the Washington Senators had finished second in the American League with 94 wins and 60 losses, eight games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

Bulkeley Stadium, Hartford, Connecticut, 1931.

Source: Hartford Courant database on Newspapers.com.

Hartford’s Minor League Club, Part III: The Senators (1916-1934)

Minor Leagues

  • Eastern League (1916-1932)
  • Northeastern League (1934)

Championship Seasons

  • 1923 & 1931

Hartford Senators in the Baseball Hall of Fame


The Hartford Senators are Connecticut’s most enduring professional sports franchise of all-time. For more than three decades (1902-1934) the Senators were Hartford’s headliner baseball club. The minor league team became an elite training ground for the Major Leagues. Legends like Lou Gehrig, Jim Thorpe, Leo Durocher and Hank Greenberg honed their skills in Hartford. The following chronology recounts the Senators franchise during their later years (1916-1934).

Hartford holds a practice at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, 1916.

By 1916, James H. Clarkin had owned the Hartford Senators for more than a decade. Clarkin’s club became a member of the Eastern League, a new Class B circuit. Former Boston Red Sox champion and 15-year veteran, Heine Wagner signed as Hartford’s nascent player-manager. The Senators recruited Paddy O’Connor, a catcher with experience in the majors while Trinity College alumnus and Hartford Public High School baseball coach George Brickley patrolled the outfield.

Heine Wagner, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1916.
Heine Wagner, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1916.
Members of the Hartford Senators, 1916.

A dismal first half of the 1916 season led to the release of Heine Wagner and veteran gaffer Jesse Burkett was appointed player-manager. One day at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, the Hartford club was visited by Judge Kenesaw Landis, who was famous for presiding over and settling a lawsuit between the outlaw Federal League and Major League Baseball. Also on hand for the occasion was former Hartford manager Dan O’Neil, who had been appointed President of the Eastern League. The Senators finished out the season in last place with a 38-79 record.

Hartford Senators & Judge Kenesaw Landis (standing, center), Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, Hartford, 1916.
Jesse Burkett, Hartford Senators, 1916.
Lefty Goldberg, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1916.
Lefty Goldberg, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1916.

In 1917, the Senators were managed by Boston native Louis Pieper who oversaw one of Hartford’s worst seasons. His pitching staff included Dave Keefe, a journeyman later picked up by Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics, as well as workhorses Ralph Head and Fred Trautman. Their catcher, Bill Skaff appeared in his second season in Hartford. The team’s best hitters were shortstop, Roy Grimes and an Amherst College graduate named Eddie Goodridge from Bristol, Connecticut. Despite strong fan support, the club suffered a .359 winning percentage.

Fred Trautman, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1917.
“Stuffy” Carroll, Catcher & Roy Grimes, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1917.
Emil Liston & Tencate, Hartford Senators, 1917.

The following year, another forgettable Eastern League season awaited the Hartford Senators. Owner Clarkin’s squad was headed by captain and player-manager, Gus Gardella. The club relied on pitchers Orlie Weaver, Andy Meyerjack and Glenn Cook and their catcher, Joe Briger hit .308 on the year. However, the 1917 season was cut short when the United States entered World War I. Every man in the nation was ordered to work or fight and as a result, the Eastern League disbanded in mid-July of 1918.

Infielders of the Hartford Senators, 1918.
Andy Meyerjack, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1918.

In 1919, the Eastern League returned. The circuit was upgraded to Class-A status, a step below the Major Leagues. Two-time World Series champion, Danny Murphy was hired as Hartford’s field manager. However, a month into the season, James Clarkin abruptly fired Murphy and appointed shortstop Roy Grimes as player-manager. Frank Brazill was the club’s corner infielder and best hitter who hit .360 in 225 at bats. Local star Eddie Goodridge returned to man first base for after serving in the military. The Senators struggled to keep opponents off the base paths, and the club landed in last place.

Management of the Hartford Senators, 1919.
George Casazza, Pitcher and Mickey Flaherty, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1919.
1919 Hartford Senators
Mayor Richard J. Kinsella tosses first pitch, 1919.
Danny Murphy, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1919.
Joe Baker, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1919.
L to R: Warren Adams, Roy Grimes, Frank Brazill (kneeling), Eddie Goodridge and Urban S. Williams of the Hartford Senators, 1919.

Reacting to another bungled season, James Clarkin turned the club upside down. With the exception of Ralph Head and Willie Adams, the entire 1920 Senators roster consisted of new players. Dan Howley was hired as manager and emergency catcher. Fred Bailey, a 24 year old outfielder and former Boston Braves prospect hit .303. George “Kewpie” Pennington had a 2.54 earned run average and won 16 of Hartford’s 70 wins. The club rose to fourth place, finishing only eight games behind first place New Haven.

James H. Clarkin, Owner, Hartford Senators, 1920.
Rex Cox, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1920.
Clarence Pickup, Outfielder and Ralph Head, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1920.
George “Kewpie” Pennington, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1920.

In 1921, owner Clarkin replaced the Wethersfield Avenue Grounds with a new venue. It was an elite venue of the minor leagues; with a grandstand made of steel and concrete, clubhouses and modern amenities. After fifteen years as owner, Clarkin doubled-down on his investment, even though winning was in short supply. The new facility became known as Clarkin Stadium (or Clarkin Field). Along with Providence, Hartford was the most coveted franchise in the Eastern League because of its central location and passionate fanbase. However, the stadium would not be ready for Opening Day and the Senators played their first two weeks on the road.

Clarkin Stadium, 1921.

Clarkin Stadium produced a higher level of baseball in Hartford. Legendary old-timer and 1884 World Series winner, Arthur Irwin accepted managerial duties and changed the franchise forever. Irwin scouted a 17 year old first baseman from Columbia University named Lou Gehrig. As a rookie phenom, Gehrig played a dozen games for the Senators in 1921. He assumed two different names, “Lefty Gehrig” and “Lou Lewis” presumably in an attempt to retain amateur status on his return to college. Gehrig would return Hartford but unfortunately the man who lured him to Connecticut would meet an untimely demise.

Players of the Hartford Senators, 1921.
Lou Gehrig, Hartford Senators, 1921.

On July 16, 1921, Hartford’s ailing manager, Arthur Irwin, jumped from the steamship Calvin Austin on a voyage from New York to Boston and perished. Former Hartford manager Thomas Dowd of the near-championship 1908 club was Irwin’s replacement. Dowd’s recurring role only lasted a month, and the team’s veteran catcher and 3-time World Series champion, Chester “Pinch” Thomas was appointed player-manager by August. One of the top performing Senators of 1921 was outfielder Hinkey Haines, who played a minor role on the New York Yankees during their 1923 World Series championship run.

Thomas J. Dowd, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1921.
Arthur Irwin (left) photographed in 1913.
L to R: James Crowley, Albert House, James Clarkin and Samuel Doty at Clarkin Stadium, 1921.

Connie Mack came to Hartford on a scouting trip near the end of the 1921 season and purchased Heinie Scheer. Mack and the Philadelphia Athletics offered Clarkin $5,000 for Scheer, a sure-handed, fleet of foot infielder. Scheer refused to go to Philadelphia unless Clarkin gave him a percentage of his transfer fee. Following a fifth place finish, owner Clarkin spoke to reporters and declared his frustration with major league clubs who poached his players.

Fred Bailey, Outfielder and Phil Neher, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1921.
Hinkey Haines, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1921.

In 1922, owner Clarkin signed world-famous Native American olympian, Jim Thorpe. In his brief time with the Senators, Thorpe crushed Eastern League pitching. His stint in Hartford would only last about six weeks. Upon being traded to Worcester, Thorpe criticized Clarkin’s methods, saying that he was pressured by Clarkin to more hit home runs. A few days after being traded, Thorpe led Worcester to two wins in a doubleheader over Hartford.

Hartford Courant pictorial of the Hartford Senators, 1922.
Jim Thorpe, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1922.

At the helm of the Senators during the Thorpe fiasco was a 35 year old player-manager, Jack Coffey. The club’s left fielder was Leo “Brick” Kane who achieved a third consecutive Eastern League season with 100 hits. Hartford had a rookie right fielder, Sy Rosenthal, who went on to play for 13 years in organized baseball. At third base was Ted Hauk, a fixture in Hartford’s lineup. The Senators of 1922 failed more often than they succeeded (73-76) and sunk to sixth in the standings.

Leo “Brick” Kane, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1922.
1922 Hartford Senators
Jack Coffey, Player-Manager, Hartford Senators, 1922.

Hartford’s lone constant, their owner James Clarkin hired a new manager in 1923. Paddy O’Connor, a former Senators catcher and a trusted baseball mind was paid a salary exceeding all other Eastern League managers. The club also welcomed back Lou Gehrig from Columbia University for 59 games. The budding star was 19 years old when he swatted a league record 24 home runs. Gehrig was a one man wrecking crew who led Hartford to the 1923 pennant. The Senators copped their first Eastern League title with a .640 winning percentage.

1923 Harford Senators – Owner James Clarkin (standing, center) and Lou Gehrig (seated, center).
Hartford Senators, Eastern League Champions, 1923.
Paddy O’Connor, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1923.

As champions, the Senators entered the 1924 season teeming with confidence. Lou Gehrig’s game continued to mature as he tore up the Eastern League with 37 homers in 504 at bats and a .369 batting average. Gehrig’s prolific days in Hartford ended when the New York Yankees called him up and went 6 for 12 in 10 games. Another standout Senator was second baseman Henry “Smudge” Demoe who smacked 184 hits, fifth most in 1924. Hartford ended the season in third place, just four games back from the pennant winners, the Waterbury Brasscos.

Ted Hauk, Third Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1924.
Carl Schmehl, Utility, Hartford Senators, 1924.
Lou Gehrig, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1924.
Senators Booster Club Membership Card signed by Lou Gehrig, 1924.
Ticket stubs from Hartford Senators game, 1924.
Henry “Smudge” Demoe, Second Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1924.

The next season brought another star player to Hartford. Leo Durocher attended his first tryout with the Senators in April of 1925. Manager Paddy O’Connor was impressed with Durocher’s defensive talent and quickness at shortstop. As a rookie, Durocher batted only .220, but he compiled a .933 fielding percentage. On August 16, 1925, “Leo the Lip” was purchased by the New York Yankees for $12,000. Durocher had played 151 games in Hartford before reporting to the Yankees.

Leo Durocher (center), Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1925.

Meanwhile, Hartford’s Tom Comiskey and Harry Hesse finished among Eastern League leaders in hits. Lem Owen and Earl Johnson were reliable starting arms for the Senators. The heart and soul of the team was their catcher, Eddie Kenna who played 144 games. Marty Shay was their second baseman and leadoff man. Henri Rondeau, a journeyman outfielder born in Danielson, Connecticut, batted .306. Hartford nearly captured the 1925 title, though the Waterbury Brasscos outperformed them by a game and a half.

Paddy O’Connor, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1925.
Paddy O’Connor shakes hands with Bill McCorry, Manager, Albany, 1925.
Eddie Kenna

In 1926, Clarkin hired former Hartford catcher Si McDonald to direct the club. Their relationship turned sour quickly and McDonald was fired in late May. Second baseman Gene Sheriden was appointed manager. The Senators finished towards the bottom of the standings but had bright spots on the season. Adolph Schinkle, a pitcher converted into an outfielder, led the Eastern League in doubles and slapped 195 hits. George Brown and John Miller were the club’s top pitchers who ranked among league leaders in earned run average.

Bob Mitchell Hartford Senators, 1926.
George Krahe, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1926.
Tom Comiskey, Hartford Senators, 1926.
Adolph Schinkle, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1926.
“Cowboy” Ken Jones, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1926.
George Kane, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1926.
Gene Sheridan, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1926.
Clifford Knox, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1926.

An accidental fire torched the Clarkin Stadium grandstand in the off-season of 1927, so the Senators played home games at Trinity College and in Manchester while repairs were made. When the new grandstand was constructed, President of the Eastern League, Herman Weisman rewarded James Clarkin, for his diligent efforts, with a gold stickpin and cufflinks encrusted with diamonds. Looking on was Hartford’s new manager, a longtime big leaguer, Kitty Bransfield. First baseman Jim Keesey proved to be a prospect, pacing the Eastern League with 204 hits on the season, while Adolph Schinkle had 203 hits.

James H. Clarkin (left) listens to President Herman Weisman (center) of the Eastern League and Mayor Norman Stevens throws ceremonial first pitch at Clarkin Stadium, 1927.
Opening Day at Clarkin Stadium, Hartford, 1927.
Kitty Bransfield, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1927.

During the 1927 season, Kiddo Davis was stationed in Hartford’s outfield. He batted .349 and went on to become a World Series champion in 1933 with the New York Giants. Jo-Jo Morrissey was also a cog in the outfield, playing his second season with the Senators. An infielder from Cuba named Eusebio González played 25 games and was Hartford’s first player of color since Jim Thorpe. Clarence “Lefty” Thomas was the club’s top performing pitcher, but the rest of the pitching staff struggled mightily, and the Senators ended up in sixth place.

Jo-Jo Morrissey, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1927.
Art Butler, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1927.

In the winter of 1928, James Clarkin decided to retire from baseball. In his 25 years as proprietor, he brought three pennants to Hartford. Clarkin was a stern, no nonsense businessman who had drawn the ire of some players and fans. Though according to his former manager Jack Coffey, he had “many endearing qualities hidden from those who did not know him intimately.” When new ownership took over, subsequently, Clarkin Stadium was renamed Bulkeley Stadium in honor of Morgan G. Bulkeley, a prominent Hartford man, first President of the National League, former U.S. Senator and Governor of Connecticut who had passed away in 1922.

James H. Clarkin retires, 1928.
Bulkeley Stadium, Hartford, 1928.
Bulkeley Stadium, Hartford, Connecticut, 1928.

Hartford’s new ownership was spearheaded by Robert J. Farrell, a local real estate developer. The purchase price for the franchise and stadium property was reported to be $200,000. Farrell created a private stock company made up of investors who expanded the grandstand at Bulkeley Stadium. John A. Danaher was hired to be the club’s Secretary to handle administrative duties. The buyout reinforced the common opinion of the day – that Hartford was a celebrated baseball city. In preparation for the 1928 season, the Hartford Senators reintroduced the fan favorite, Paddy O’Connor as manager.

Robert J. Farrell, President, Hartford Senators, 1928
Board of Directors, Hartford Baseball Club, 1928.
Opening Day batter for the Hartford Senators, 1928.
Mayor Norman Stevens throws first pitch, 1928.
Mayor Norman Stevens (left) and Bob Farrell, Owner, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Paddy O’Connor, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1928.

During the 1928 campaign, John “Bunny” Roser was Hartford’s newest and most valuable slugger. He earned the league home run title with 27 round-trippers. At second base, Scott Slayback demonstrated a capable bat with 10 homers. A southpaw pitcher named Russ Van Atta threw for a marvelous 2.49 earned run average before being called up by the New York Yankees. Carl Schmehl and Tom Comiskey played their final seasons in Hartford, and the club placed third in the 1928 Eastern League.

William Eisemann, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Skee Watson, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Dominique Paiement, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Pete Stack, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Heine Scheer, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Jack Levy, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1928.
John Styborski, Pitcher Hartford Senators, 1928.

Going into the 1929 season, the Senators made a splash in the press when they signed a 2-time World Series champion, Heinie Groh as player-manager. The club then resigned their former second baseman of 1921, Heinie Scheer. Corner outfielder John Roser hit another 25 home runs while his counterpart Bill Hohman mashed 24 long balls. Utility man Skee Watson had a brilliant year at the plate, hitting for a .324 average in 593 at bats. Mike Martineck batted .337 and replaced Groh as player-manager in late August.

Heinie Groh and Robert J. Farrell, Hartford Senators, 1929.

The Senators would struggle to pitch effectively throughout the year. Their best hurler was 5’8″ Dan Woodman who threw 236 innings with a 3.74 earned run average and a 13-14 win-loss record. Local amateur pitchers, Sam Hyman and Johnny Michaels received professional contracts, making several key appearances on the mound. Their starting catcher, Joe Smith had a solid defensive and offensive season. However, adequate individual performances did not translate into a successful 1929 campaign, and Hartford ended the year in last place.

Players of the Hartford Senators, 1929.
Infielders of the Hartford Senators, 1929.
Johnny Roser, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Gary Fortune, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Walter Brown, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Sam Hyman, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Heinie Groh, Third Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Joe Smith, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Shep Cannon, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.

On May 23, 1930, fans witnessed an exhibition between the Senators and Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics at Bulkeley Stadium. Because of an illness Mack was not present, but Commissioner Landis attended as a guest of Mayor Walter Batterson. That same season, rookie first baseman and future Hall of Fame inductee Hank Greenberg played 17 games for the Senators. Baseball was a welcome spectacle during tough economic times of the Great Depression, though Hartford’s season would be cut short. The club folded on June 30, 1930, due to financial insolvency. New Haven, Pittsfield and Providence also halted operations, reducing the Eastern League to four clubs.

The Hartford Senators with Mayor Batterson and Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, 1930.
Judge Kenesaw Landis and Mayor Walter Batterson, 1930.
Oriental Corella, Second Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Bernie Hewitt, First Baseman and Bill Cooper, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Hank Greenberg, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Tom Mullen, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Raymond J. Utley, Treasurer, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Joe Malay, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1930.
King Bader, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Skee Watson, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1930.
A view south down Main Street in Hartford, Connecticut, 1930
Bill Hohman, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1930.

By spring of 1931, the Eastern League returned with eight clubs, including Hartford with new ownership. Bob Farrell sold the Senators to the Brooklyn Dodgers organization. Dodgers business manager, Dave Driscoll became president of the Hartford affiliate from his office in Brooklyn. Driscoll sent Earl Mann to run operations as business manager of the Senators. 27 year old Charles Moore was chosen as manager and backup catcher. Paul Richards was the starting catcher, team leader in home runs and later became a known as a genius inventor (patented the “Iron Mike” pitching machine). Hartford’s best overall hitter was Red Howell, who finished fourth in the league in batting average.

Management of the Hartford Senators, 1931.
Future Players of the Hartford Senators, 1931.
Infielders of the Hartford Senators, 1931.
Earl Mattingly, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Norman Sitts, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Red Howell, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Hartford Courant report by Albert W. Keane, 1931.
Max Rosenfeld, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Bobby Reis, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Hartford Senators visit Camp Courant, 1931.

Hartford dominated the Eastern League in 1931, winning 97 of 137 games. They captured the pennant on the backs of superior pitching and eleven players who had big league experience. The Senators received seven Eastern League All-Star selections: Bob Parham, Bobby Reis, Paul Richards, Van Mungo, Earl Mattingly Jr. and Phil Gallivan. Most distinguished among them was Van Mungo who later earned five National League All-Star selections. Johnny Mann and Al Cohen were also major contributors to the team’s championship run. The 1931 Hartford Senators are recognized as one of the 100 greatest minor league teams of all time.

1931 Hartford Senators
Paul Richards, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Bob Parham, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Al Cohen, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1931.
1931 Hartford Senators

Hartford’s 1932 season began with an unfurling of the Eastern League pennant at Bulkeley Stadium. Business manager Earl Mann did the honors and posed for the cameras. Charles Moore was rehired as field manager, yet when the Dodgers requested that he coach their Jersey City affiliate, Moore obliged. The Senators named shortstop Bill Marlotte player-manager even though first baseman and captain Norman Sitts was presumed to take the role. Before the managerial move, the Senators were four games back from first place. After Moore left, Hartford sank to the bottom of the standings.

Earl Mann, Business Manager, Hartford Senators unfurls the pennant on Opening Day, 1932.
Charley Moore, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1932.

Honorable mentions on the Senators of 1932 include: Red Howell who batted .349, Bruce Caldwell, a Yale University graduate, Jim Henry, a rookie pitcher and Byron Topol, a little-known third baseman. Veteran players Johnny Mann, Eddie Kenna and Pinky Pittenger played their last seasons in Hartford. On July 18, 1932, the Hartford Courant suddenly reported the demise of the Eastern League due to poor attendance. Waning interest and continued economic woes hampered ticket revenues. Club owners met in New York City and voted to cancel the circuit.

Bill Marlotte
Al Kimbrel, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Roy Humphries, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Phil Gallivan, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Dave Cochlin, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Johnny Mann, Utility, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Jim Henry, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Eddie Kunsberg, Pitcher/First Baseman, Hartford Senators 1932.
Allentown vs. Hartford Senators at Bulkeley Stadium, 1932.

There would be no minor league baseball in Hartford during the year of 1933. Instead, local jeweler. Bill Savitt rented Bulkeley Stadium and staged his semi-professional Savitt Gems against professional and independent clubs. Not until 1934 did the Senators restart operations in the newly formed Northeastern League. Johnny Roser settled in again as the club’s power-hitter. A 38 year old first baseman named Snake Henry had a brilliant year at the plate. Hartford had talent but they lacked consistency. Three different managers attempted to steer the team, who finished in fourth place.

Mayor Beach tosses the first pitch at Opening Day, Hartford, 1934.
Lee Kulas, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Fred Henry, Player-Manager, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Johnny Roser, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Emil Planeta, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Pepper Rea, Third Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Jim Clark, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Bob Walsh, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Dr. Edward Baker, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1934.

Sources

  1. Hartford Courant database on Newspapers.com
  2. SABR Bio Project – Danny Murphy
  3. SABR Bio Project – Lou Gehrig
  4. Statscrew.com

Lou Gehrig Used Fake Name as a Rookie on the Hartford Senators

This article was written by Norton Chellgren and published in the 1975 Baseball Research Journal

On April 5, 1921, the Hartford Senators of the Eastern League in their first exhibition game of the season beat Columbia University 4-3. The big story was a Columbia player, Lefty Gehrig, who hit Hartford pitcher Alton Durgin for two long home runs in his only two trips to the plate. A. B. McGinley of the Hartford Times described the second home run like this: “When he came up again in the 3rd inning, Durgin the lofty Maine boy who was pitching for Hartford was all set for revenge. He got a strike on Gehrig but the next one he threw Gehrig leaned on and it went sailing out of the enclosure past a big sundial and almost into the School of Mines. It was a mighty clout and worthy of Babe Ruth’s best handiwork.”

Lou Gehrig, First Baseman, Columbia University, 1922.

The young player greatly impressed Hartford Manager, Arthur Irwin, a former major league player and manager. The two home runs would have cleared the center field fence at Clarkin Stadium, Hartford’s home park, and Irwin saw a promising future for the young baseball player.

Clarkin Stadium, Hartford, Connecticut, 1921.

The big first baseman, it was later reported, had promised Irwin that he would play under him if he decided to enter professional baseball. Several big league teams had been trying to sign him but all indications were he would stay at Columbia University. Subsequently, on June 2, announcement was made by Manager Irwin in the local newspapers that the hard hitting semi-pro from Brooklyn, Lefty Gehrig, had been signed to play first base for the Senators. It was assumed by some that he had decided to quit school.

Arthur Irwin, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1921.

The next day the newspapers were apparently requested or advised not to call further attention to the Columbia athlete’s real name and from that day on they referred only to that young player from New York, “Lewis” or “Lou Lewis.” On June 3 (1921) the Hartford Senators beat the Pittsfield Hillies 2-1. Lou Lewis played the full game at first base. In his O. B. debut, he was 0 for 3 with one sacrifice hit against Pittsfield hurler Al Pierotti, who later went up to the Braves.

Lou Gehrig batting for Columbia University, 1921.

After that initial game the Hartford Courant wrote “Lou Lewis, Arthur Irwin’s latest discovery was planted on the initial sack. The youngster who is only 18 years old (actually he was still 17) appeared to be a bit nervous. After he gets used to surroundings he may develop. They seldom fail to make the grade with Irwin teaching the ways of baseball.”

Lewis’ first hit and first run scored came in his second game as Hartford beat the Waterbury Brasscos 5-3 at Hartford before 5,000 fans on June 4. In the second inning the youthful first sacker hit the first ball pitched by Fred Rawley to right field for three bases. He scored shortly after when the next batter Phil Neher singled to center. On the following day, June 5, Lewis went two for five as Hartford beat Albany 10-2 at Albany; the first baseman was beginning to impress and was being touted as a “Babe Ruth.”

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1922
Lou Gehrig, Punter, Columbia University, 1922.

Hartford beat Pittsfield 10-6 on June 8, and the Times wrote: “Lewis caught hold of a fast one in the third inning and sent it against the “B” in the Buick sign on the right field fence for a double. Lewis probably won’t get a Buick for his clout but he may get a ride in one before the season runs its course.” Lou went two for five that day. One of the times he made an out he slammed a terrific drive that traveled at the proverbial mile-a-minute clip into right fielder Bill McCorry’s gloved hand. It was described as the hardest hit of the game.

Hartford Courant excerpt, June 8, 1921.

While Lewis at the young age of 17 was demonstrating his ability to knock the cover off the ball there were some indications that he lacked experience. On June 10 the Senators were trailing the Bridgeport “Brown Derbies” in the last of the ninth when with one out Heinie Scheer singled. Lewis then hit one to the box carrying a lot of smoke and it bounded off pitcher Ed Lepard’s glove for a single. Lewis a moment later was trapped off first by catcher Joe Smith on a pitchout. The rally was effectively stopped and the game was lost by Hartford, 4 to 2.

The Times wrote on June 11, “Lewis the youngster just breaking into organized ball with the local club is doing as well as one can expect and his present work gives fans here hopes that he will add to the Hartford hitting average which at present is the weakest link in the pennant-winning chain. The young first sacker is a slugger.” Lefty Lewis unexplainedly did not play in the Bridgeport game on June 13 but the next day against the Springfield Ponies he hit the second triple of his early professional experience.

In his last Eastern League game that year, on June 15, 1921, against Springfield, he showed his power even though his only hit was an infield one. In the first inning he crashed one against third baseman Jack Flynn’s shins and the ball caromed off with such force that it bounced across the diamond and the runner on third base, Harry Hesse, scored without any trouble.

Lou Gehrig “Lewis” plays his last game of 1921.
Harry Hesse, Hartford Senators, 1922.

No game was played on June 16 and at that point the young first baseman’s name, without explanation, ceased to appear in the Hartford papers for the remainder of the season. During his stay Hartford, winning 8 games and losing 5, had climbed into first place with a 28-17 record. Before the season was to end the Hartford Senators would drop to fifth place and its Manager, Art Irwin who had been successful in luring the young first baseman into professional baseball, if only for a short 12 games, would meet an untimely death. On July 16, 1921, he fell or jumped from the steamer Calvin Austin during a voyage from New York to Boston.

Lou Gehrig, Hartford Senators, 1923.

Even with a mediocre batting average of .261, Lewis had given Hartford fans an indication of things to come. The name “Lou Lewis” would not again appear in a Hartford or other professional baseball game box score! “Lou,” however, would return to the Eastern League in 1923 (as of August 2) and hit home runs at a pace which still has not been surpassed in the Eastern League, 24 home runs in only 59 games.

1923 Hartford Senators

What the Hartford newspapers did not report was that Columbia athletic officials had learned that Gehrig was playing pro ball under an assumed name. After being advised of the possible implications of playing for money, an unhappy Lou Gehrig returned promptly to New York City. As a result of this escapade Lou had to wait an extra year, until the fall of 1922, before he could participate in Columbia inter-collegiate sports. The experience might have hurt the New York Giants as well because had it never taken place, who knows, McGraw might have been able to sign up Lou Gehrig in 1923 instead.

Lou Gehrig and Mayor Norman Stevens of Hartford, 1924.

Source: Chellgren, Norton. “The Short Career of Lou Lewis.” Society for American Baseball Research, 1975 Baseball Research Journal, 1975, sabr.org/journal/article/the-short-career-of-lou-lewis.

Leo Durocher Got His Start in Hartford

Leo Ernest Durocher was born in 1905 in West Springfield, Massachusetts, as the youngest of four sons. His parents with French Canadian parents were George and Clarinda (Provost) Durocher and often spoke French at home. George Durocher worked on the railroad, for the Boston & Albany Railroad. At 5-feet-10, he grew to be the tallest of his brothers. His French-Canadian parents. Durocher dropped out of Springfield Technical High School after being suspended and never went back. Instead, he became a prominent semi-professional athlete and several employers competed to have him play for their company teams.

According to baseball historian Paul Dickson, Durocher was convinced to try for a professional club, the Hartford Senators:

“There’s a guy named David Redd, who’s a black man, who pushes and pushes and pushes Durocher to go try out for the Hartford team, which in those days was a semi-Yankee farm club,” Dickson says. “And Durocher does. Tries, fails once.”

Paul Dickson – WBUR, Robinson And Durocher’s Complicated — And Changing — Relationship

Having failed, Durocher was again encouraged to try out for the 1925 season again by his friend, David Redd. This time, he made the team and batted for an average of .220 in 536 at bats that season. As an infielder for Hartford, Durocher learned and grew his game under Manager Paddy O’Connor, a baseball lifer and former catcher of the 1909 World Series winning Pittsburgh Pirates. Durocher showed promise in Hartford under the lights at Clarkin Stadium and was called up to the New York Yankees lineup for 2 game appearances.

Leo Durocher is sold to the Yankees, 1925.

It would take two seasons in the Yankees farm system – Atlanta, Georgia and St. Paul, Minnesota – before his permanent call-up to the big leagues in 1928. He won his first World Series that same year as a teammate of Babe Ruth and another Hartford Senators alumnus, Lou Gehrig. Durocher would become known as one of baseball’s fiercest players and would achieve team and individual success.

As a captain of the St. Louis Cardinals “Gashouse Gang” in 1934, Durocher started shortstop and won another World Series. He also collected three National League All-Star game appearances. After the 1938 season with the Cardinals, Durocher became the Dodgers’ player-manager. In 1939, Durocher was named player-manager for the Dodgers and quickly became known for his dirt-kicking tirades against umpires. He also clashed with Brooklyn’s front office and claimed that he was fired and rehired by general manager Larry McPhail dozens of times.

In 24 years as a skipper for the Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Giants, Chicago Cubs and Houston Astros, Durocher won 2,009 games, three pennants and a World Series. However, Durocher also became famous for his arguments with umpires, executives and players earned him a reputation as “The Lip.” His nickname was thought to have stemmed from his relationship with another diminutive Hall of Famer: Rabbit Maranville. While not an imposing hitter, Durocher’s scrappy play and maximum effort led Babe Ruth to call him “The All-American out.”

Leo Durocher, Manager, Brooklyn Dodgers, 1941.

Despite his antics, there was no doubt about Durocher’s record. In 1941, Durocher led the Dodgers, who were affectionately named “the Bums” by their own fans, to the franchise’s first pennant in 21 years.

“As long as I’ve got a chance to beat you, I’m going to take it.”

Leo Durocher, 1941.

In 1947, Commissioner Happy Chandler suspended Durocher for a year due to his “accumulation of unpleasant incidents” which included his accused association with gamblers. Led by Jackie Robinson, who Durocher staunchly supported when he broke the color barrier, the Dodgers captured the ’47 National League pennant.

In 1948, Durocher shocked the baseball world when he became manager of the Dodgers’ crosstown rival New York Giants – who he had famously referred to when he remarked that “nice guys finish last.” It was at the Polo Grounds where Durocher found his greatest success. In 1951, his Giants capped off an incredible 13½ game comeback on the Dodgers with Bobby Thomson’s famous “Shot Heard ’Round the World” homer to win the pennant. Three years later, Durocher and the Giants swept the heavily favored Cleveland Indians in the 1954 World Series.

Durocher with his wife, Laraine, Day, 1950.

Durocher left New York after the 1955 season and became a color commentator for NBC’s baseball broadcasts. He returned to the manager’s office with the Cubs in 1966 and served his final nine seasons in Chicago and Houston. Durocher retired in 1973 as the fifth-winningest manager in history, and second only to Hall of Famer John McGraw in the National League.

Casey Stengel, Manager, New York Yankees and Leo Durocher, Manager, New York Giants, 1951 World Series.

Upon his retirement, he ranked fifth all-time among managers with 2,009 career victories, second only to John McGraw in National League history. In 1965, Durocher co-authored an autobiography entitled, Nice Guys Finish Last. He lived a long life but passed away on October 7, 1991. Leo Durocher was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.

Leo Durocher

Sources

  1. WBUR, Robinson And Durocher’s Complicated — And Changing — Relationship.
  2. Hartford Courant Database, Newspapers.com.
  3. Baseball-Reference.com, Baseball-Reference.com.
  4. Durocher, Leo, Baseball Hall of Fame, Baseballhall.org/Hall-of-Famers/Durocher-Leo.

Jim Thorpe, Olympian and Hartford Ballplayer

James Francis Thorpe was the greatest all-around athlete of the Deadball Era and perhaps of all time. In addition to playing five Major League seasons, he was a superstar football player as well as an Olympic gold medalist. Battling bigotry and discrimination, Jim Thorpe rose to stardom with perseverance and defiance. Unknown to many locals of today, the 6’1” 185 lbs sportsman brought his talents to Hartford, Connecticut, on multiple occasions.

Born on May 28, 1887, Thorpe was a member of the Sauk and Fox Nation of the Oklahoma Territory. His Native American name was Wa-Tho-Huck (Bright Path or Path Lit by Lightning). As a youngster, he attended Haskell Indian School in Lawrence, Kansas, and then Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania. He played halfback on the Carlisle football team under coach Pop Warner and was selected by Walter Camp to the 1911 and 1912 All-American teams.

Jim Thorpe at Stockholm Olympics, 1912.

At the 1912 Stockholm Olympic Games, Jim Thorpe won the decathlon and pentathlon by wide margins. Sweden’s King Gustav told him, “Sir, you are the greatest athlete in the world.” However in 1913 an investigation by the Amateur Athletic Union claimed Thorpe to be ineligible for playing professional baseball in 1909 and 1910. During those years, Thorpe did earn $2 per game in the Eastern Carolina League as an outfielder and pitcher. He was subsequently stripped of his gold medals.

1913 New York Giants with Jim Thorpe (3rd row, middle).

Thereafter, Thorpe signed a three-year contract for $6,000 per season to play baseball with John McGraw’s New York Giants. As a rookie, Thorpe recorded 19 games, a home run and stole two bases as the club won the 1913 National League pennant. He was a bench player for the Giants who loaned him to the Cincinnati Reds in April of 1917. Thorpe was recalled to New York in August, and the Giants won another league title. Manager McGraw allowed Thorpe a larger role in 1918 when he hit .248 in 58 games.

Jack Meyers and Jim Thorpe (right), 1915.
1915 New York Giants with Jim Thorpe (3rd from right).

After complaining about playing time and refusing to be mistreated, Thorpe was traded to the Boston Braves in 1919. The 32 year old began to hit his stride, batting .327 with 25 RBI and 7 stolen bases for the Braves. He continued to pursue organized baseball with five different minor league clubs including Hartford. All the while, Thorpe played professional football in the fall and winter months. From 1920 to 1921, Thorpe was nominally appointed as first President of the American Professional Football Association, later becoming the National Football League.

Jim Thorpe, Outfielder, Cincinnati Reds, 1917.

That same year, Thorpe was released from the Portland, Oregon, baseball club of the Pacific Coast League. Then he was signed in June of 1922 by James H. Clarkin, owner of the Hartford Senators. Thorpe immediately traveled to Connecticut with his family who settled at 34 Lancaster Road, West Hartford. As a Senator, Thorpe crushed Eastern League pitching, however his stint in Hartford would only last about six weeks.

Hartford Courant, June 6, 1922.
Thorpe’s Hartford Senators debut, June 15, 1922.

On July 12, 1922, Thorpe played centerfield in a doubleheader at New Haven’s Weiss Park where he had a bad day: “Thorpe was plain awful. He had dropped a fly ball, muffed a grounder and failed to hustle after a ball hit in the gap. New Haven’s fans were all over him, abusing him mercilessly with racist taunts. News accounts were equally childish and bigoted in context. One report cited Thorpe’s performance as ‘an imitation of a wooden Indian chasing flies.’

He was benched by Hartford manager Jack Coffey. Seething with anger, ”Thorpe promptly changed out of his baseball uniform into his street clothes. He emerged from the clubhouse and charged into the grandstand to confront the New Haven hecklers, saying he wasn’t ‘going to stand for the impertinence of the fans.‘ Thorpe never threw a punch. Teammates persuaded him to return to the clubhouse before any fighting broke out. Police were called to the scene, though no arrests were made.”*

Thorpe was fined $50 by the Eastern League and $50 by the Hartford club. In early August, he was released by owner Clarkin. Thorpe finished the year with the Fitchburg-Worcester club, and his .344 batting average was second in the Eastern League. He also hit 9 home runs in 96 total games played, but 1922 marked Thorpe’s final season in professional baseball.

Thorpe’s athletic fame did not translate into a lasting fortune. He drifted from one public relations exploit to the next and wrestled with alcoholism. The sports hero worked part-time as a painter, bouncer and ditch digger. Thorpe’s football career kept him afloat. He often came back to Connecticut to face professional football squads such as the short-lived Hartford Blues. He retired from football in 1928, but continued to make baseball appearances throughout the country.

Jim Thorpe in football uniform, c. 1925.

In 1933, Thorpe came back to Hartford as a player-manager of the Oklahoma Indians, a barnstorming team also dubbed Harjo’s Indians. At the time, many athletes of color embellished their racial characteristics and adopted stereotypes in order to maximize profits. During the month of August, thousands of paid fans witnessed a five game series at Hartford’s Bulkeley Stadium between the Oklahoma Indians and the Savitt Gems, a local independent team.

Thorpe began the first of five games as third base coach. He then manned right field midway through the game. On a drive by Jackie Cronin of the Gems, Thorpe made contact with the ball near the foul line. Umpire John Muldoon called the ball fair but Thorpe vehemently disagreed. Dejected over losing the argument, Thorpe pulled his team off the field and demanded the umpires to be dismissed before resuming play. The umpires were replaced by players from each team and the game continued.

Hartford Courant, August 6, 1933.
Jim Thorpe, Manager, Harjo’s Indians, 1933.

The Savitt Gems eventually won the series 3 games to 2, and Hartford baseball fans earned a good show. Later, Savitt Gems owner Bill Savitt would question whether or not Thorpe’s antics were intentional. Perhaps he overreacted to rile up the crowd, thereby attracting more fans to Bulkeley Stadium. After all, the crowd did double in size from about 3,000 to about 6,000 at their next matchup. Thorpe, ever the showman, led the Indians in staged war dances between games.

1933 Oklahoma Indians (Harjo’s Indians)

In 1950, Thorpe was named America’s top athlete of the half century by the Associated Press, beating out Babe Ruth. By then Thorpe had appeared in more than 70 Hollywood films. A biographical film entitled Jim Thorpe – All-American produced by Warner Bros. and starring Burt Lancaster was released in 1951. On March 28, 1953, Jim Thorpe died of a heart attack in Lomita, California at the age of 65. 

Jim Thorpe (1887-1953)

In 1982, the International Olympic Committee restored Thorpe’s two gold medals and they were presented to survived family. Thorpe’s widow, his third wife, Patricia sold his remains to the cities of Mauch Chunk and East Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania. The two towns combined to form Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, where he is laid to rest, though he never visited the place during his lifetime. Thorpe’s children led an effort to return their father to the Sauk and Fox Nation in Oklahoma but lost the lawsuit in 2014.

Jim Thorpe’s tomb and statue in Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania.

Sources

  1. New Haven Register Article on Thorpe*
  2. SABR – Jim Thorpe
  3. Hartford Courant Database


Current Causes

  1. Restore Jim Thorpe as sole gold medal winner.
  2. Bright Path movie

Hartford’s Minor League Club Part II: The Senators (1902-1915)

The Hartford Senators are Connecticut’s most enduring professional baseball franchise of all time. For more than three decades (1902-1934) the Senators were Hartford’s headliner club. The minor league team became an elite training ground for players on their way to the Major Leagues. Legends like Lou Gehrig, Jim Thorpe, Leo Durocher and Hank Greenberg honed their skills in Hartford. The following chronology recounts the Senators during their early years (1902-1915) when minor league championships were a significant source of local pride. Thus far, since entering the minor leagues in 1878, the City of Hartford had been deprived of a pennant.

Minor Leagues

Championship Seasons

  • 1909
  • 1913
  • 1915

Notable Hartford Senators of the early years

The nickname “Senators” was bestowed upon the club in 1902 by the Hartford Times newspaper. That year, Hartford became a member of the Connecticut League. Home games were hosted at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds also called Hartford Baseball Park. The organization was headed by Charles A. Soby. Team meetings were held at Soby’s cigar store at 867 Main Street. Catcher Ira Thomas played his rookie season for the Senators of 1902 and later won two World Series championships with the Philadelphia Phillies. Frank Reisling was Hartford’s player-manager who later sued the club over unpaid wages after being fired for allegedly recruiting players to a team in Toledo, Ohio. Hartford ended the season in fourth place.

Charles A. Soby, Proprietor, Hartford Senators, 1902.
Ira Thomas, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1902.
Doc Reisling, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1902.
Doc Reisling, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1902.

By next season the Hartford franchise was purchased by baseball magnates William J. Tracy of Bristol and Thomas Reilly of Meriden. Reilly acted as manager and the Senators rejoined the Connecticut League of 1903. Hartford’s team consisted of an entirely new roster with the exception of Ira Thomas who returned as catcher. Fresh signees included Walter Ahearn of New Haven, Bill Luby of Meriden and Billy Derwin of Waterbury. A talented infield featured Larry Battam at third base and captain Bert Daly at second base. However the Senators struggled mightily and finished last in the league.

Thomas Reilly, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1903.
Walter Ahearn, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1903.
Dr. Bert Daly, Second Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1903.
Bill Luby, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1903.

Before the 1904 season, Thomas Reilly was elected Mayor of Meriden and sold his shares of the Hartford club to William J. Tracy. As sole owner of the Senators (and later President of the Connecticut League), Tracy appointed his friend and Bristol barbershop owner John E. Kennedy as manager. The only man to return from the previous season was second baseman Bert Daly. New players like Bill Foxen, Bill Karns and Tom Bannon entered the fold. The Senators had a below average season record (53-61), and Hartford’s decades-long championship drought continued.

William Tracy, Owner, Hartford Senators, 1904.
Thomas O’Hare, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1904.
John E. Kennedy, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1904.
1904 Hartford Senators

In September of 1904, Hartford was introduced to James H. Clarkin, proprietor of the Senators for the next 24 years. When Tracy decided to sell the club, Clarkin and Daly stepped in as owners. Clarkin leased Wethersfield Avenue Grounds for the next six years at a rate of $600 per year. Hartford fans took special trolleys to the highly regarded and well-kept baseball grounds. Starring for the club were pitching prospect, Pete Wilson of Springfield, Massachussetts, and shortstop Harry Noyes of New Haven. In Clarkin’s first season as proprietor, the Senators of 1905 won a majority of their games (58-55).

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1905.
James Clarkin, Owner, Hartford Senators, 1905.
Lajoie’s Base Ball Guide excerpt, 1905.
Peter Wilson, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1905.
Harry Noyes, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1905.
Neal Doherty, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1905.
Frank Doran, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1905.
1905 Hartford Senators
Hartford trolley assigned for ball games, 1905.

After the 1905 season, Clarkin sold the club’s top pitcher William Foxen to Providence for $250. The sale of Foxen was the first of many transacted by Clarkin who acquired a frugal reputation for selling off players. In 1906, Bert Daly served as player-manager until midway through the season, when he returned to his home in Bayonne, New Jersey to practice medicine. Harry Noyes was named player-manager and Clarkin became sole owner of the Senators. He signed Herman Bronkie of Manchester, Connecticut, a rookie third baseman who later matriculated to the Cleveland Naps. When the season concluded Hartford stood fourth in the Connecticut League.

Group of Three Hartford Players, 1906.
New players on the Hartford Senators, 1906.
Bert Daly, Player-Manager, Hartford, 1906.
1906 Hartford Senators
1906 Hartford Senators
1906 Hartford Senators
1906 Hartford Senators

Despite another lackluster season, Hartford retained its core players for the following year. Harry Noyes remained as player-manager and Pete Wilson as ace pitcher. Other returners for 1907 were outfielder, Charlie Fallon, a steady batsman from New York City as well as career minor leaguers Ed Justice, Billy Luyster and Edward Gastmeyer. Newcomers included first baseman Jack Rothfuss and outfielder Izzy Hoffman. Philadelphia manager Connie Mack tipped off proprietor Clarkin to recruit Jack Lelivelt, a Dutch immigrant who became one of baseball’s greatest minor league hitters. As incentive to win, Clarkin offered his Senators a bonus of $100 if they won five games in a week. While popular with players, Hartford’s bonus scheme failed and the Senators finished fifth in the Connecticut League of 1907.

Three New Hartford Players, 1907.
Jack Lelivelt, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1907.
Izzy Hoffman, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1907.
John Dalgarn, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1907.
Billy Luyster, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1907.

Proprietor Clarkin sought to retool the Senators by hiring veteran leadership for 1908. During the offseason, Thomas Dowd, a former major league journeyman was named manager and assumed all baseball operations. Dowd lured players to Hartford such as Ray Fisher, a pitching phenom, Hank Schumann, a sturdy moundsman, Bob Connery, a muscle bound first baseman, Earle Gardner, a second basemen destined for the New York Yankees and Chick Evans, an 18 year old who threw a perfect game for the Senators on July 21,1908. They were Hartford’s finest team to date, and yet they lost the championship to Springfield by a mere half game.

New Hartford Senators, 1908.
1908 Hartford Senators
Thomas Dowd, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1908.
1908 Hartford Senators
Hartford Senators at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, 1908.

A disappointing conclusion to Hartford’s 1908 season lit a fire under the Senators in 1909. Clarkin appointed Bob Connery player-manager in place of Thomas Dowd who reportedly struggled with alcoholism. New additions Jimmy Hart and Jack Wanner led the squad in batting. With masterful pitching and defense, Connery’s crew captured first place and remained there for the majority of the season. Hartford finally won their first Connecticut League championship by outlasting the runner-ups of Holyoke. On September 13, 1909, the Senators were honored with a parade on Main Street, a ceremony in front of Connecticut’s Old State House, a musical performance at Hartford Theater and a late night banquet at Hotel Garde.

1909 Hartford Senators, Connecticut League Champions.
1909 Hartford Senators
Johnny Wanner, Second Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1909.
Quartet of players, Hartford Senators, 1909.
Ballplayers of the Hartford Senators, 1909.
Mike Wadleigh, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1909.
New players for the Hartford Senators, 1909.
George Metzger, Third Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1909.
1909 Hartford Senators, Connecticut League Champions.

In 1910, Hartford was the envy of minor league baseball as the Connecticut League pennant was flown on over Hartford Baseball Park. The facility was the prettiest in the circuit with a smooth playing surface, clubhouse and refreshment booth. Meanwhile Clarkin further delegated his duties as owner and created the Hartford Baseball Club Board of Strategy to scout ballplayers. Roster additions included mound men Buck O’Brien and Carl Lundgren as well as infielders John Vann and Gus Soffel. Incumbent player-manager Bob Connery brought aboard fellow St. Louis native Wally Rehg, a rookie utility man later dubbed the world’s sassiest player. Amid high expectations, the Senators underachieved to fourth place, six games behind the title winners of Waterbury.

First day’s workout, Hartford Senators, 1910.
Senators at Hartford Baseball Park, 1910.
1910 Hartford Senators
John Vann, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1910.
Walter Rehg, Utility, Hartford Senators, 1910.
Buck O’Brien, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1910.
Board of Strategy, Hartford Senators, 1910.
Carl Lundgren, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1910.
William Moore, Groundskeeper, Hartford Baseball Park, 1910.

Before the 1911 season, Connecticut League officials increased the championship purse from $25 to $100. That year, rookie outfielder Hugh High rose to local stardom by posting a .302 batting average in 431 at bats. Former Boston Doves pitcher Tom McCarthy only played half of the season, yet he twirled his way to 15 wins. Hartford welcomed back Harry Noyes and Pete Wilson after playing elsewhere, but both underperformed. A low point of the season came when arrest warrants were issued for nine Hartford players including manager Connery, when they were found drinking alcohol on a Sunday at a hotel party on Lighthouse Point, New Haven. The Senators would fall short of the ultimate league prize but finished in a respectable third place.

1911 Hartford Senators
Clint Ford, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1911.
Hugh High, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1911.
Robert Henry Ray, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1911.
Nick Lakoff, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1911.
Nick Lakoff, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1911.
John Hickey, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1911.
Herman Shincel, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1911.
1911 Hartford Senators

As winter descended on Hartford, proprietor Clarkin renewed his lease of the Wethersfield Avenue Grounds for ten more years and built a big league caliber grandstand. When the 1912 season began, Bob Connery suited up for his final managerial campaign. He would later discover Rogers Hornsby as a scout for the St. Louis Cardinals. Before departing, Connery signed Benny Kauff to a one-year deal who batted .321 in 53 games played. Hugh High led the Connecticut League in hits with 145, 5 of them homers, over 121 games. Si McDonald served as primary catcher in his second year with the club and captained the Senators to second place.

A new grandstand at Hartford Baseball Park, 1912.
New Players of the Hartford Senators, 1912.
Bob “Tom” J. Connery, Player-Manager, Hartford Senators, 1912.
Hugh High, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1912.
New Haven vs. Hartford, 1912.
Members of the Hartford Senators, 1912.
Waterbury vs. Hartford, 1912.
Si McDonald, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1912.
Bill Powers, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1912

At an offseason meeting President Jim O’Rourke and loop officials renamed the Connecticut League to the Eastern Association, reflecting the inclusion of three Massachussetts clubs. In preparation for the 1913 season, the Senators announced Si McDonald as Hartford’s new player-manager. Important acquisitions were shortstop, Bill Morley, second baseman, Jim Curry and first baseman, Mickey Keliher. Centerfielder Benny Kauff had one of the best seasons in Hartford baseball history, leading the league with 176 hits and a .345 batting average. Behind superior pitching, the Senators dominated their way to 83 wins and another triumphant league championship.

1913 Hartford Senators
Benny Kauff, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1913.
Gus Gardella, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1913.
1913 Hartford Senators
Eastern Association final standings, 1913.

Most of Hartford’s championship players were resigned for the 1914 season. Si McDonald became full-time manager while Hartford born Jack Muldoon was promoted to starting catcher. McDonald was eventually deposed midyear by proprietor Clarkin, who assigned the job to Dan O’Neil, a veteran manager from Holyoke. New arrivals Ed Barney and Jack Hoey were the club’s most productive hitters. Pitchers Clyde Geist and Fred Rieger carved out brilliant seasons and were among the league leaders in wins. When the Eastern Association wrapped, Hartford had achieved their tenth consecutive winning season, but ultimately finished in fifth place.

1914 Hartford Senators
Dan O’Neil, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1914.
Maurice Kennedy, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1914.
Jimmy Curry, Second Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1914.
Jack Hoey, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1914.
Roger Salmon, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1914.
Ed Goeb, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1914.
Mickey Keliher, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1914.
Murray Parker, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1914.
James Crowley, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1914.

In 1915, proprietor Clarkin decided to abandon the Eastern Association. Instead he enrolled the Senators in the Colonial League; a minor league loosely affiliated with the infamous Federal League. Shortly before the season, 36 year old infielder Jim Delahanty was named Hartford’s player-manager. Delahanty mashed a .379 batting average, was the league’s most valuable player and led the Senators to the Colonial League title. Also on the squad were Federal League players who previously performed for the Brooklyn Tip Tops and the Newark Pepper clubs. A mix of outcast big leaguers won Hartford its third minor league baseball championship and the Senators ended their early years on a high note.

1915 Hartford Senators, L to R: Back Row – Mike Simon, George Textor, Dennis Gillooly, Gus Helfrich, Gil Whitehouse, Aime Proulx and Fred Trautman. Front Row – Blondie Sherman, Henry Demoe, Jim Delahanty, Jack Murray and Ray Werre.
Gil Whitehouse, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1915.
Clyde Geist, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1915.
Bill Jensen, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1915.
Hartford Senators on the New York Yankees, 1915.

Sources

  1. Hartford Courant via Newspapers.com
  2. Hartford Times microfilm collection at Hartford Public Library
  3. Baseball-Reference.com
  4. Statscrew.com
  5. Bob Connery SABR Bio by Steve Steinberg

Hartford’s Minor League Club, Part I: The Hartfords (1878-1901)

Hartford in Minor Leagues:

  • International League (1878)
  • Connecticut State League (1884-1885)
  • Southern New England League (1885)
  • Eastern League (1886-1887)
  • Atlantic Association (1889-1890)
  • Connecticut State League (1891, 1895)
  • Atlantic League (1896-1898)
  • Eastern League (1899-1901)

Notable Players:

Hartford, Connecticut, has been represented by 71 affiliated and unaffiliated minor league baseball clubs. It began when the Hartford Dark Blues of the National League moved to Brooklyn in 1877, and the city was left without a professional club. In an era when teams traveled by train or steamboat, Hartford was an ideal location for organized baseball. A prime mover in forming the Dark Blues, Ben Douglas Jr. raised $4,000 from shareholders to establish Hartford’s first minor league team in 1878. Initially, Douglas organized the club in Providence, Rhode Island, then he moved operations to New Haven, but ultimately selected Hartford.

Hartford Base Ball Grounds, 1877.
Hartford Courant excerpt, March 5, 1878.

The Hartford Courant referred to the club as The Hartfords. They held games at the Base Ball Grounds on Wyllys Avenue. The club joined the International Association after being denied entry into the National League due to the city’s small population (about 40,000). However, major League caliber players appeared for Hartford in 1878 such as Candy Cummings, Everett Mills, Jack Lynch and Joe Battin. Yet, the team was a short-lived entity. The Hartfords were expelled from the league after failing to pay a mandatory guarantee to the Buffalo club.

Jack Lynch, Pitcher, Hartford, 1878.
Jack Lynch, Pitcher, Hartford, 1878.
Everett Mills, First Baseman, Hartford, 1878.
Joe Battin, Third Baseman, Hartford, 1878.
Candy Cummings, Pitcher, Hartford, 1878.
Hartford Courant excerpt, July 19, 1878.

Hartford’s first foray into minor league baseball ended on an embarrassing note. Consequently, the city was without a professional club for the next five years. Finally in February of 1884, Hartford Base Ball Park Association, a joint stock corporation founded a new team in the Connecticut State League. The Hartfords of 1884 played at a new ballpark on Ward Street. Baseball enthusiast and cigar magnate, Charles A. Soby was team manager as well as President of the Connecticut State League. He directed affairs from the Hartford Base Ball Headquarters on Main Street, a leftover base of operations from the days of the Hartford Dark Blues.

Charles Soby, Manager, Hartford, 1884.
Hartford Base Ball Headquarters, 258 Main Street, Hartford, Connecticut, 1884.

In 1885, the Hartfords competed in the Southern New England League of which Soby was again appointed President. Former Dark Bluesoutfielder, Jack Remsen took over as player-manager. Before becoming a Hall of Fame manager Connie Mack was Hartford’s wiry catcher at 22 years old. Backup catcher, Tony Murphy was one of the first baseball players to wear a chest protector. Henry Gruber, from Hamden, Connecticut, and Frank Gilmore from Webster, Massachussetts, did most of the pitching. Hartford natives Bill Tobin and Jack Farrell rounded out an underachieving roster who fell short of a championship title.

Jack Farrell, Second Baseman, Hartford, 1885.
Henry Gruber, Pitcher, Hartford, 1885.
Jack Remsen, Player-Manager, Hartford, 1885.
Connie Mack, Catcher, Hartford, 1885.

The Hartford Base Ball Club of 1886 contended in the first iteration of the Eastern League. The club dealt Connie Mack to the Washington Nationals midseason. Another Hall of Fame inductee, Hugh Duffy spent his first professional year in Hartford. After an lackluster season, a new joint stock company assumed ownership of the club. Among investors of the Harford Amusement Association were the Mayor of Hartford, Morgan G. Bulkeley and famed author, Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain). The association hired Charles E. Daniels, a professional umpire from Colchester, Connecticut, as manager for the 1887 season.

Investors like Bulkeley and Twain back base ball in Hartford, 1887.
Investors like Bulkeley and Twain back the Hartford club, 1887.

Under Charlie Daniels the Hartfords of 1887 fielded their best lineup yet. That year, “General” James Stafford began his career with Hartford. Steve Brady, former captain of the New York Metropolitans and hometown hero of Hartford, batted .350. Ed Beecher led the league in doubles and Henry Gruber was one of the league’s top pitching aces. At season’s end, the Hartfords placed third in the standings. The Eastern League disbanded and Hartford was forced to forgo organized baseball throughout the year of 1888.

Steve Brady, First Baseman, Hartford, 1887.
General Stafford, Second Baseman, Hartford, 1887.
Ed Beecher, Outfielder, Hartford, 1887.

The Hartfords reappeared on the minor league scene in 1889 as part of the Atlantic Association. Hartford man and first time player-manager, John M. Henry recruited Phenomenal Smith and Joe Gerhardtto contend for a title. However they finished in third place behind Worcester and Newark. Then Hartford failed to retain top tier players in 1890 and sunk to last place. Third baseman Ezra Sutton and catcher George Stallings of Boston fame were the team’s lone bright spots. A game of particular note came on July 23, 1890, when Hartford’s first game illuminated by “electric light” took place at the Ward Street Grounds.

Phenomenal Smith, Pitcher, Hartford, 1889.
Joe Gerhardt, Second Baseman, Hartford, 1889.
George Stallings, Catcher, Hartford, 1890.
Baltimore vs. Hartford, 1890.

After another mediocre season in the 1891 Connecticut State League, the Hartfords lost favor with fans and investors. The club disbanded and the Panic of 1893 prolonged their absence. Eventually, a new team surfaced in the summer of 1894. John Henry, Charlie Daniels, Steve Brady and his brother Jackson Brady formed the Hartford Elks. They were a semi-professional team backed by the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (Lodge #19). Though the team featured minor league players, the club operated independently from the Connecticut State League.

John M. Henry, Player-Manager, Hartford, 1894.
John M. Henry, Player-Manager, Hartford, 1894.
Hartford Courant excerpt, July 10, 1894.

In 1895, Hartford reentered the Connecticut State League and operated under the auspices of the Hartford Base Ball and Amusement Association. John Henry returned as player-manager one last time. Ed Beecher, a revolving outfielder from Guilford, Connecticut, suited up for his fourth and final season. Both men later became police officers in Hartford. Another local man, John Gunshanan was one of the club’s best hitters. Future major leaguers Jack Cronin and Bill Gannon had brief stints with the Hartfords of 1895. Despite big league prospects, a pennant continued to elude the city of Hartford.

John Gunshanan, Outfielder, Hartford, 1895.
Hartford Courant excerpt, February 7, 1895.
Jack Cronin, Pitcher, Hartford, 1895.

The Hartfords came close to a championship when they entered the Atlantic League in its inaugural season of 1896. Former Hartford player and famed baseball manager, Billy Barnie purchased the club with a group of investors. He served as Hartford’s manager and garnered enough support to build a new ballpark on the west side of Wethersfield Avenue (later becoming Clarkin Stadium and then Bulkeley Stadium). Also nicknamed the Hartford Bluebirds, the club was captained by Bob Pettit, a utility man from Williamstown, Massachusetts. Everyday players like John Thornton and Reddy Mack lifted Hartford atop the standings in a tight race with Newark.

Billy Barnie, Manager, Harford, 1896.
Reddy Mack, Second Baseman, Hartford, 1896.
Site plan of Hartford Base Ball Park, 1896.
Hartford Ball Park Ad, 1896.

When Newark finished in first place, Hartford protested their victory. Manager Barnie argued that Newark’s record was unfairly inflated due to a dozen extra games played. Newark also used a suspended pitcher named Joseph Frye who had left Hartford midway through the season. As a result, the second place Hartfords challenged Newark to a 7-game series; the Soby Cup sponsored by Hartford’s own Charles Soby. Newark declined the invitation but the third place Paterson club accepted and prevailed over Hartford for the Soby Cup. By November of 1896, the matter was put to rest by Sam Crane, President of the Atlantic League who declared Newark as champions.

The Soby Cup, 1896.
Soby Cup Series, 1896.
Sam Crane, President of the Atlantic League, 1896.

Hartford returned to the Atlantic League in 1897. Former Brooklyn Bridegrooms standout, Thomas “Oyster” Burns became player-manager when Billy Barnie left Hartford to manage Brooklyn. Tom Vickery, Cy Bowen and Hank Gastright were moundmen for Hartford. Veteran major leaguers Lefty Marr and Paul Radford manned center field and shortstop. The club won 78 games but finished third in the standings yet again. On the final day of the season, Hartford players presented a commemorative diamond ring to their beloved leader, Oyster Burns.

The Hartfords of 1897.
Cy Bowen, Pitcher, Hartford, 1897.
Oyster Burns, Outfielder, Hartford, 1897.

In 1898, executives of the Hartford baseball club hired veteran major leaguer Bill Traffley as manager. Traffley was unpopular with players, he was accused of pocketing gate receipts and he relinquished the manager role halfway through the season to the team’s catcher, Mike Roach. The Hartfords adopted a cooperative system to evenly disperse gate earnings amongst the players. Therefore the team became known as the Hartford Cooperatives. Arlie Latham, 1886 World Series champion and baseball’s first showman comedian, guarded third base for the Cooperatives who descended to sixth place in the Atlantic League.

Bill Traffley, Manager, Hartford, 1898.
Arlie Latham, Third Baseman, Hartford, 1898.
Hartford Courant excerpt, 1898.

Towards the end of the 1898 season, Billy Barnie purchased ownership of the Hartfords once again. Even though Barnie was manager of the Springfields at the time, Hartford fans were delighted to have him back. With Barnie as manager, Hartford enrolled in the Eastern League of 1899. He signed several players from the Brooklyn Bridegrooms, including William Shindle who led the team in hitting. Tuck Turner was the team’s star right fielder. For a 24 game stretch, Hartford featured Louis Sockalexis, the first Native American to play professional baseball. The club compiled 50 wins and 56 losses thereby finishing seventh place in the Eastern League.

Biff Sheehan, Outfielder, Hartford, 1899.
William Shindle, Player-Manager, Hartford, 1899.
`Louis Sockalexis, Outfielder, Hartford, 1899.

At the turn of the century, Charles Soby reprised his role as Hartford’s preeminent baseball magnate. On May 21, 1900, Soby led a group of 44 shareholders who raised $3,250 to establish the Hartford Baseball Corporation. The club partnered with New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company to create special rates and train schedules on game days. The team secured two pitchers destined for stardom, “Wild” Bill Donovan and George Hemming. Tragically, Manager Billy Barnie died of pneumonia on July 15, 1900. Barnie was revered in Hartford as baseball’s most tenured manager, as catcher for the Hartford Dark Blues of 1874 and the Hartfords of 1878.

Billy Barnie, Manager, Hartford, 1900.
Billy Barnie, Manager, Hartford, 1900.
Hartford Baseball Club, 1900.
George Hemming, Pitcher, Hartford, 1900.
“Wild” Bill Donovan, Pitcher, Hartford, 1900.

In place of Barnie, William Shindle assumed managerial duties for the remainder of the 1900 season. The team’s performance was respectable. “Wild” Bill Donovan achieved league highs in wins and strikeouts. Though it would not be enough for a pennant, and the Hartfords settled for third in the Eastern League. The next season Shindle stayed on as manager. George Shoch, a veteran pitcher ended his 20-year career with Hartford. In fact, most of the 1901 club was made up of players on the last leg of their careers. The club fell to sixth out of eight teams in the final standings.

Hartford vs. Brockton, 1901.
George Shoch, Pitcher, Hartford, 1901.

After more than 20 years in the minor leagues without a championship, Hartford’s proud baseball community refused to be discouraged. A minor league team would represent Hartford off and on for the next 5 decades. On August 17, 1925, Hartford players of yore were celebrated at Bulkeley Stadium. Connie Mack, Frank Gilmore, John Henry and Ed Beecher attended an exhibition game between Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics and a Hartford All-Star team featuring local pitching ace, Lem Owen. In a ceremony before the game, Gilmore gifted Mack a new set of golf clubs and the Hartfords of old received their last ovation from a crowd of 6,000 fans.

Connie Mack, Frank Gilmore, John Henry and Ed Beecher at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, Hartford, August 17, 1925.

Sources

  1. Hartford Courant database on Newspapers.com
  2. StatsCrew.com

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