Tag: red sox

5-time World Series Champion, Jack Barry of Meriden

Meriden, Connecticut, native Jack Barry was a reliable shortstop in the early years of the American League. Most notably, he played shortstop on Connie Mack‘s fabled $100,000 Infield. Mack, who began his professional career in Meriden, signed Barry to the Philadelphia Athletics in 1908. At the time of his signing, Barry was captain of the Holy Cross baseball team in Worcester, Massachusetts. He would go on to play eleven seasons in the major leagues and became a proven winner, earning five World Series rings.

Jack Barry, Infielder, Philadelphia Athletics, 1908.
Jack Barry, Infielder, Philadelphia Athletics, 1913.

Though Jack Barry had a mediocre .243 career batting average, he was a marvelous defensive player who had a winning record every year except for his first and his last in the majors. With Philadelphia, Barry earned World Series victories in 1910, 1911 and 1913. During the 1911 World Series, he hit .368 versus John J. McGraw‘s New York Giants, beating them in six games. Barry also appeared in the 1914 World Series but lost to the miracle Boston Braves. He was lauded by sportswriters as the A’s best fielder and perhaps the best infielder in the American League.

“$100,000 Infield” – L to R: Stuffy McInnis, Frank “Home Run” Baker, Jack Barry and Eddie Collins of the Philadelphia Athletics, 1913.

Despite his talents, Barry was sold midseason by Connie Mack to the Boston Red Sox, in part, due to financial pressures caused by the nascent Federal League. Barry joined a Boston roster which included rookie pitcher, Babe Ruth. Alongside Ruth, Barry continued to win ballgames on a playoff bound club. At the 1915 World Series against the Philadelphia Phillies and their ace, Grover Cleveland Alexander, the Red Sox took the series in five games.

Jack Barry, Infielder, Boston Red Sox, 1915.
Jack Barry, Infielder, Boston Red Sox, 1915.

In 1916, Barry appeared in 94 games during the Regular Season and Boston would repeat as champions. However, Barry did not appear in a playoffs game due to an injury. Instead, he served as Assistant Manager during the postseason under Holy Cross teammate and Red Sox manager, Bill Carrigan. The next season Boston’s owner Harry Frazee promoted Barry to player-manager. However, by the middle of 1917, a patriotic Barry became one of the first professional ballplayers to enlist for World War I.

I consider it my duty to do all I can for my country…I’m no slacker. If I can be of any use, I’ll quit baseball.”

Jack Barry, Washington Times, July 29, 1917.
L to R: Babe Ruth, Bill Carrigan, Jack Barry and Vean Gregg of the Boston Red Sox, 1915.

Barry and four other Red Sox players, who had enlisted as yeomen in the Naval Reserve, were called to active duty and ordered to report on November 3, 1917. They were stationed at Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston throughout the 1918 season, while Ruth and the rest of the Red Sox captured another World Series. On the orders of his commanding officer, Barry managed a major league caliber team on the base. The servicemen were known as Jack Barry’s Charlestown Navy Yard nine, but they called themselves the Wild Waves.

Braves Field, Boston, Massachusetts, c. 1920.

Barry’s Navy Yard All-Stars featured two future Hall of Fame inductees; his Red Sox teammate, Herb Pennock and his former A’s teammate Rabbit Maranville. King Bader and Ernie Shore were also among the team’s well known members who aimed to use baseball star power to boost American morale. The Wild Waves matched up against amateur, college and professional clubs and on a few occasions, performed before an estimated crowd of 40,000 fans at Braves Field.

Babe Ruth, Jack Barry and Rabbit Maranville, Braves Field, 1935.

Due to Barry’s year-long absence from the Red Sox, owner Frazee hired Ed Barrow as Boston’s manager in 1919. Then in June, Barry was traded back to Philadelphia as part of a four-man deal. At 32 years old with an ailing knee, Barry was no longer the player he had once been. He retired from professional baseball a few weeks later. In his major league career, Barry compiled 1,009 hits, 10 home runs and 429 RBI in 1,223 games. Even though he never made the AL All-Star Team, Barry exhibited defensive dependability, baseball intelligence and winning intangibles.

Jack Barry, Manager, Holy Cross, meets with Joe Cronin, Infielder, Boston Red Sox, 1937.

In 1921, Barry was tapped to be head coach at his alma mater, College of the Holy Cross. During his tenure, he posted the highest career winning percentage (.806) in collegiate history and eventually won the 1952 College World Series. Barry was head coach at Holy Cross for more than 40 years until his death in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts at age 73. in 1966, he was among the first class of inductees to the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame. Barry also became an inaugural veteran inductee of the College Baseball Hall of Fame In 2007, along with Lou GehrigChristy Mathewson and Joe Sewell.

Jack Barry (right), Manager, Holy Cross, 1951.

Jack Barry was buried at Sacred Heart Cemetery in Meriden, Connecticut, a few miles away from where he grew up on Grove Street. The City of Meriden and its residents honored his legacy by naming one of their a Little League divisions Jack Barry Little League. The league existed from 1950 until 2020 when it merged with Ed Walsh Little League, named for Ed Walsh, another major leaguer from Meriden. In Worcester, Massachusetts, the Little League program has retained the name Jack Barry Little League to this day.

Sources

  1. Meriden’s Jack Barry and the Wild Waves by Michael Griffen on Slideshare.net.
  2. Jack Barry SABR Bio Project entry by Norman Macht.
  3. Various articles found on Newspapers.com.

Greater Hartford’s Own Jose Birriel

Jose A. Birriel was born on November 14, 1964 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. As a young man Birriel showed great athletic ability, especially as a left handed batter and first baseman. The Boston Red Sox signed him at 18 years old. In his first year as a professional Birriel banged 10 home runs, 56 RBI and a .351 average for Elmira of the New York Penn League. The following season he led the Florida State League in fielding percentage, assists, putouts and double plays while hitting 16 homers for the Winter Haven Red Sox.

Hartford Courant excerpt, July 2, 1988.

By 1986, Jose Birriel was called up to the Double-A New Britain Red Sox. He quickly earned a reputation as a top defensive first basemen in the Eastern League. In 1987, Birriel had a breakout season with 10 home runs, 57 RBI, a .292 batting average, and a .991 fielding percentage in 117 games played. Birriel spent 7 years in the Boston Red Sox organization. During this time, he was selected to 4 minor league all-star games, set the all-time club record for most runs batted in, and on occasion, the lefty also showed a knack for pitching.

Jose Birriel, First Baseman, Society for Savings, 1990.
Hartford Courant excerpt, June 29, 1990.
Hartford Courant excerpt, June 29, 1990.

Birriel was eventually promoted to Triple-A with the Pawtucket Red Sox in 1988. However he was only given 21 at bats and had 2 hits. He was released from the Red Sox that same year. The following summer Birriel was living in Hartford and joined the Society for Savings ball club in the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League. As a member of Tom Abbruzzese’s team, Birriel hit 6 home runs in 62 at bats and was named an all-star. Birriel played a final season in the Mexican League in 1991 before ending his baseball career.

New Britain Red Sox hat.
Jose Birriel career stats, Baseball-Reference.com.

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Jeff Bagwell, From Hartford to the Hall

  • Born: 5/27/1968 in Boston, Massachussetts
  • High School: Xavier High School (Middletown, Connecticut)
  • College: University of Hartford
  • GHTBL: Malloves Jewelers
  • Cape Cod League: Chatham A’s
  • Drafted: 1989, Boston Red Sox, 4th Round, 109th Overall.
  • Traded: Boston Red Sox send Bagwell to Houston Astros for pitcher Larry Andersen in 1990.
  • Major League Debut: 4/8/1991
  • Awards: Rookie of the Year (1991), National League MVP (1994) and 4-time All-Star.
  • National Baseball Hall of Fame: 2017
Jeff Bagwell (left) with teammates from University of Hartford, 1987.
Jeff Bagwell (right), Malloves Jewelers, GHTBL, 1987.
Jeff Bagwell, Malloves Jewelers, GHTBL 1987.

Jeff Bagwell, University of Hartford, 1988.
Jeff Bagwell, University of Hartford, 1988.
Jeff Bagwell, Chatham A’s, Cape Cod League, 1988.
Jeff Bagwell, New Britain Red Sox, 1990.
Jeff Bagwell, New Britain Red Sox, 1990.
Jeff Bagwell, Houston Astros, 1991.
Jeff Bagwell, Houston Astros, 1991.
Jeff Bagwell, Houston Astros, 2004.
Jeff Bagwell inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, 2017.

View Jeff Bagwell’s MLB career batting statistics on Baseball-Reference.com

When Big Papi Rocked New Britain

Originally signed by the Seattle Mariners in 1992, David “Big Papi” Ortiz was traded to the Minnesota Twins organization in 1996. In 1997, he played first base for the New Britain Rock Cats. In his first Double-A season, Ortiz hit for a .322 average with 14 home runs, 56 RBI and even stole 2 bases. He was eventually promoted to the majors with the Minnesota Twins and hit .327 during his big league debut. Ortiz returned to New Britain for 9 games in 2001 during a rehab assignment. He was released by the Twins and signed with the Red Sox in 2003. Ortiz helped the Red Sox win the World Series in 2004, their first in 86 years.

David Ortiz, First Baseman, New Britain Rock Cats, 1997.

After playing in New Britain, David Ortiz had an illustrious, Hall of Fame caliber career:

  • 3× World Series champion (2004, 2007, 2013)
  • World Series MVP (2013)
  • ALCS MVP (2004)
  • 10× All-Star (2004–2008, 2010–2013, 2016)
  • 7× Silver Slugger Award (2004–2007, 2011, 2013, 2016)
  • 2× AL Hank Aaron Award (2005, 2016)
  • Roberto Clemente Award (2011)
  • AL home run leader (2006)
  • 3× AL RBI leader (2005, 2006, 2016)
  • 541 career home runs
  • Boston Red Sox No. 34 retired

When Babe Ruth Barnstormed Greater Hartford

A young George Herman “Babe” Ruth visited the Greater Hartford area of Connecticut, to play baseball on multiple occasions. Like many big leaguers of his time, Ruth barnstormed the nation to earn additional pay. When he first visited the Constitution State in the fall of 1918, Ruth was a 23 year old starting pitcher for the Boston Red Sox. He had won more games than any left-handed pitcher in the previous four seasons. During that stretch, he compiled a 2.28 earned run average and a .650 winning percentage. His phenomenal achievements and large physical traits gave him instant appeal.

Ruth warming up at the 1918 World Series.

Ruth’s first appearance in Connecticut came after the 1918 World Series wherein the Red Sox defeated the Chicago Cubs. A victorious Ruth pitched 29 ⅔ scoreless innings (a mark not broken until Whitey Ford recorded 33 ⅔ innings in 1961). Attending the World Series was James H. Clarkin, sole proprietor of the Hartford Senators of the Eastern League. Clarkin tried to recruit both teams to play an exhibition game in Hartford benefiting American soldiers fighting in World War I. When his offer was declined Clarkin managed to land Babe Ruth instead.

Ruth and Boston Red Sox win 1918 World Series.

When Connecticut baseball fans received reports of Ruth’s arrival, they were clamoring to see him in action. Days after winning his second World Series, he appeared in several exhibition games throughout the state. His initial stop was in New Haven at Lighthouse Point Baseball Park. Ruth played first base for the semi-pro New Haven Colonials. He slugged a home run in a 5 to 1 loss against the Cuban Stars made up of players from the Negro Leagues.

Hartford Courant, September, 15, 1918.

The next evening, on Saturday, September 14, 1918, Ruth departed from New Haven and arrived in Hartford. He attracted large crowds of people hoping to meet the budding superstar. He was driven into the city by Manager Curtis Gillette of the semi-pro Hartford Poli’s baseball club to lavish accommodations at Hotel Bond on Asylum Street. The Hartford Poli’s were known as one of the “fastest” clubs in New England. The next day, Ruth joined the Poli’s on the Hartford’s top-notch diamond at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds.

Hotel Bond, Hartford, Connecticut.

On Sunday, September 15, 1918, Babe Ruth and the Hartford Poli’s opposed the Fisk Red Tops of Chicopee, Massachusetts. While pitching and batting third, he recorded two hits including a double off the “Bull Durham” tobacco sign on the center field wall. Ruth also threw a complete game shutout, allowed 4 hits and led the Poli’s to a 1-0 victory. He beat his Red Sox counterpart, Dutch Leonard who guest starred on the mound for the Fisk Red Tops. Another Red Sox teammate, Sam Agnew played catcher for the Poli’s and drove in the game’s only run. Ruth and the gang entertained a Hartford crowd of more than 5,000, earning $350 for his appearance.

Babe Ruth, Boston Red Sox, 1918.

A week later, Ruth once again played at the Wethersfield Avenue Grounds for the Hartford Poli’s in a doubleheader. In the opening game, the Poli’s went head to head with the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft company nine. Five Major Leaguers including Ruth appeared that day. Ruth again was starting pitcher and hit third in the lineup. Even though he pitched well, Ruth was out-dueled by his Red Sox teammate and Pratt & Whitney guest star, “Bullet” Joe Bush who won the game by a score of 1 to 0.

Babe Ruth and “Bullet” Joe Bush, Boston Red Sox, 1918.

In the second game of the doubleheader, Ruth and the Poli’s faced an army base nine from Fort Slocum near New Rochelle, New York. Ray Fisher, former Hartford Senator turned New York Yankees ace mowed down Poli batters. The Fort Slocum nine beat the Poli’s by a score of 4 to 1. Ruth played first base, hit a single and scored the Poli’s lone run. A crowd of about 3,000 people were in attendance for this rare occasion; a doubleheader featuring Babe Ruth in Hartford.

Ray Fisher, New York Yankees, 1916.

The Babe must have enjoyed stopping over in Connecticut, because in autumn of the following year, he came back. This time he brought his Boston Red Sox teammates to Muzzy Field in Bristol, Connecticut, where Ruth would set a new record. On September 21, 1919, he played first base and hit fourth for the Red Sox versus Bristol’s semi-pro juggernaut, the New Departure Endees. The team was sponsored by New Departure, a division of General Motors, and a manufacturer of ball bearings for automobiles, planes, ships and military equipment.

Babe Ruth & Eddie Goodridge of New Departure, Muzzy Field, 1919.

Also on the field for the Red Sox was Hall of Fame outfielder, Harry Hooper who had two hits and a run on the day. Though it was Babe Ruth who stole the show. “All eyes were pointed at the famous baseball mauler,” according to the Hartford Courant when he blasted the first ever home run at Muzzy Field. Hooper was on first base when the Babe connected with a pitch thrown by New Departure’s Freddie Rieger, a star pitcher for the Pittsfield team in the Eastern League. Ruth’s homer sailed over the right field fence as 5,000 onlookers cheered in adulation. The Red Sox won by a score of 6 to 2 over New Departure. The game would be remembered as Connecticut’s most thrilling sporting event of the year.

Babe Ruth and Lester Sigourney, New Departure Manager, Muzzy Field, 1919.
L to R: DeWitt Page, Babe Ruth and Judge William J. Malone, Muzzy Field, 1919.
New Departure Baseball Club, 1919.
Babe Ruth marker at Muzzy Field, 2014.

While the rest of the Red Sox went home, Ruth stay in Connecticut. He played first base in another game with the Hartford Poli’s on September 28, 1919 at Poli Field in East Hartford. The Poli’s were met by the New Britain Pioneers, the Hardware City’s top ball club. Mayor of Hartford, Richard J. Kinsella threw out the game’s ceremonial first pitch and posed for a photograph with Ruth. The Babe hit two balls over the right field fence but was only allowed one base for each long ball due to a “short porch” ground rule. Earlier that day he had hit a batting practice homer said to be struck over 500 feet. The Poli’s shutout the Pioneers 3 to 0 before a crowd of more than 6,000 fans.

Babe Ruth and Mayor Richard J. Kinsella, Hartford, Connecticut, 1919.
Spectators at Poli Field, East Hartford, Connecticut, 1919.

A few months later, on January 5, 1920, Babe Ruth was purchased by the New York Yankees from the Red Sox for $125,000 cash and $300,000 in loans. His services were sold after Ruth refused to return to the Red Sox at a salary of $10,000 per year. The Yankees struck the deal of the century. Ruth went on to smash his own home run record with an astounding 54 dingers in the 1920 season, while batting at .376 clip. New York only made Ruth bigger, better and in higher demand to fans across the country. Fortunately for cranks in Connecticut, the Babe kept coming back to play for the Poli’s.

Hartford Courant, January 6, 1920.

By the end of 1920, the New York Yankees were runner-ups in the American League behind the Cleveland Indians. As the season came to a close, Manager Gillette of Hartford persuaded Ruth to join the Poli’s once more. Again they faced the New Departure squad at Muzzy Field. On October 2, 1920, The Babe hit clean up for the Poli’s, played every position except pitcher and went 4 for 4 with 3 singles and a double. Nonetheless, New Departure shutout the Poli’s 7 to 0 thanks to crafty pitching from Gus Helfrich, a minor league spitball hurler from the New York State League. Extra trains and trolleys were scheduled to Bristol that Saturday afternoon, allowing 10,000 fans a chance to see Babe Ruth one last time at Muzzy Field.

Babe Ruth coming to Muzzy Field, Bristol, Connecticut, 1920.
Babe Ruth at Muzzy Field, Bristol, Connecticut, 1920.
Babe Ruth at Muzzy Field, Bristol, Connecticut, 1920.
Babe Ruth at Muzzy Field, Bristol, Connecticut, 1920.
Babe Ruth at Muzzy Field, Bristol, Connecticut, 1920.

Connecticut’s amateur and semi-pro baseball clubs regularly hosted Babe Ruth and in return, he left a long-lasting impression. In Greater Hartford and beyond, Ruth earned baseball thousands of new fans. He barnstormed throughout the East Coast in grand fashion, ushering in the home run era and baseball’s Golden Age (1920 to 1960). He retired in 1935 after leading the New York Yankees to their first 4 World Series wins. Ten years later, Babe Ruth took the final at bat of his career when he appeared in an exhibition game for the Savitt Gems at Hartford’s Bulkeley Stadium.

Babe Ruth on the Savitt Gems, Hartford, Connecticut, 1945.

Sources

  1. Hartford Courant Database on Newspapers.com

Related

  1. The “Babe Comes to Hartford by Ronald Bolin
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World Series Club Features Bobby Valentine

Bobby V reminiscences about baseball in West Hartford.

Stamford, Connecticut, native Bobby Valentine has not been following baseball as much this past couple of months due to his nonstop busy schedule, however, he made time to visit West Hartford to speak to the World Series Club about the common passion everyone in the room shares: baseball.

“This is the baseball time of the year. Some people here love the sport of baseball and they asked if I can come up and I said absolutely. For a free meal I’d do anything,” Valentine said with a grin. “I just wanted to get into the game with the crowd and answer their questions about what we all love and it’s the game of baseball.”

Valentine, 67, was introduced by his former player, Gary Burnham Jr., who played under Valentine in 2009 in Japan. To this day, both men remain close and, for Burnham, it was a no-brainer to introduce his former manager.

“I built a great relationship with him and now he’s just really a great friend,” Burnham said. “I am just super happy to be here and it’s an honor for me to introduce such a great guy.”

This is not the first time Valentine has spoken to the organization; he has made two prior visits in the 1970s and ’80s. However, baseball was different then and he is intrigued to see the new direction MLB is taking with the implementation rules to speed up place.

“I think the game should be quicker,” Valentine said. “You know all these mound visits are probably going to be the things of the past and all we have to do is have the younger generation understand the competition.”

Valentine says during his managing career, he did not believe in mound visits and had his pitching coach go to the mound to speak to his pitchers. If Valentine had to count, he says he probably made 10 mound visits during his professional managerial career.

Valentine, like other baseball junkies, is also looking forward to the new Yankees slugging tandem of Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton and the potential of what the two sluggers can produce. The Connecticut native also expects the new Yankee skipper Aaron Boone, who he worked with for two years at ESPN, to excel under pressure in New York.

On the other side of the Boston/New York rivalry, Valentine expressed mixed feelings on the Red Sox signing J.D. Martinez.

“Well, I think if he is healthy, he is the necessary piece to that puzzle. I think if he was left-handed he’d fit a lot better than him being right-handed,” Valentine said.

For Len Montanari, who has been a member of the World Series Club for 15 years, said it was a treat for people like Valentine to come to their meetings and reveal the insights of the shenanigans that happened behind the closed doors.

“For a baseball fan in the winter, it is like going through withdrawal,” Montanari said. “(Valentine) is a very colorful guy and he has an extraordinary history. He was fired by George Bush while at Texas, its fun to hear the backstory about things like that.” 

Although Valentine’s passion for baseball continues, he remains focused on his tenure as Athletic Director at Sacred Heart University.

– Written by Kimberly Pena, Hartford Courant

League Notes

– Gary Burnham Jr. is now the GM of the newest team in the GHTBL, the South Windsor Phillies and the league is ecstatic to have him involved. Gary owns a property management business and has a family of five of his own who live in South Windsor.

– Special thanks from the GHTBL goes out to the Worlds Series Club, especially to Tim Brennan, his family and the Montanari Family.