Tag: lou gehrig

Hartford’s Minor League Club, Part III: The Senators (1916-1934)

Minor Leagues

  • Eastern League (1916-1932)
  • Northeastern League (1934)

Championship Seasons

  • 1923 & 1931

Hartford Senators in the Baseball Hall of Fame

The Hartford Senators remain Connecticut’s most enduring professional sports franchise of all-time. For more than three decades (1902-1934) the Senators were Hartford’s headliner baseball club. The minor league team became an elite training ground for players on their way to the Major Leagues. Legends like Lou Gehrig, Jim Thorpe, Leo Durocher and Hank Greenberg honed their skills in Hartford. The following chronology recounts the Senators franchise during their later years (1916-1934).

Hartford holds a practice at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, 1916.
Heine Wagner, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1916.
Heine Wagner, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1916.
Lefty Goldberg, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1916.
Lefty Goldberg, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1916.

By 1916, James H. Clarkin had owned the Hartford Senators for more than a decade. Clarkin’s club became a member of the Eastern League, a new Class B circuit. Former Boston Red Sox champion and 15-year veteran, Heine Wagner signed as Hartford’s nascent player-manager. The Senators recruited Paddy O’Connor, a catcher with experience in the majors. Trinity College alumnus and Hartford Public High School baseball coach George Brickley patrolled the outfield.

Members of the Hartford Senators, 1916.

A dismal first half of the 1916 season led to the release of Heine Wagner and veteran baseball guru, Jesse Burkett was appointed player-manager. One day at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, the Hartford club was visited by Judge Kenesaw Landis who had become famous for presiding over and eventually settling a lawsuit between the Federal League and Major League Baseball. Also on hand for the occasion was former Hartford manager Dan O’Neil, who had been appointed President of the Eastern League. The Senators would finish out the season in last place with a 38-79 record.

Hartford Senators & Judge Kenesaw Landis (standing, center), Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, Hartford, 1916.

In 1917, the Senators were managed by Boston native Louis Pieper who oversaw one of Hartford’s worst seasons. His pitching staff included a journeyman pitcher Dave Keefe, later picked up by Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics, as well as workhorses Ralph Head and Fred Trautman. Their catcher, Bill Skaff was in his second season with Hartford. The team’s best hitters were shortstop, Roy Grimes and an amateur turned professional named Eddie Goodridge from Bristol, Connecticut. Despite overwhelming local support, the club finished with a horrid .359 winning percentage.

Fred Trautman, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1917.
“Stuffy” Carroll, Catcher & Roy Grimes, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1917.
Emil Liston & Tencate, Hartford Senators, 1917.

The following year, another forgettable Eastern League season awaited the Hartford Senators. Owner Clarkin’s squad was headed by captain and player-manager, Gus Gardella and veteran catcher, Joe Briger who hit .308 as a Senator. The club relied on pitchers Orlie Weaver, Andy Meyerjack and Glenn Cook. However, the season was cut short when the United States was pulled into World War I. Every man in the nation was ordered to work or fight. As a result, the Eastern League disbanded in mid-July of 1918, Hartford finished 29-28 and no team was awarded the league title.

Infielders of the Hartford Senators, 1918.
Andy Meyerjack, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1918.

In 1919, the Eastern League advanced to Class A status, a step below the Major Leagues. Two-time World Series champion, Danny Murphy was hired as Hartford’s field manager. Yet, James Clarkin abruptly fired Murphy a month into the season and appointed shortstop Roy Grimes as player-manager. Frank Brazill was the club’s big bat corner infielder who hit .360 in 225 at bats. Local star Eddie Goodridge returned to man first base for Hartford after a serving in the war effort. The Senators struggled to keep opponents off the basepaths and finished last in the Eastern League.

Management of the Hartford Senators, 1919.
1919 Hartford Senators
Danny Murphy, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1919.
Joe Baker, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1919.

In response to another bungled season, James Clarkin turned the club upside down. With the exception of Ralph Head and Willie Adams, the entire roster consisted of players in their first year with Hartford. Dan Howley was hired as manager and emergency catcher. Fred Bailey, a 24 year old outfielder and former Boston Braves prospect hit .303. George “Kewpie” Pennington had a 2.54 earned run average and pitched the Senators to 16 of their 70 wins. Hartford rose to fourth place in 1920, finishing only 8 games behind the New Haven club.

James H. Clarkin, Owner, Hartford Senators, 1920.
Rex Cox, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1920.
Clarence Pickup, Outfielder and Ralph Head, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1920.
George “Kewpie” Pennington, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1920.

In 1921, James Clarkin replaced the Wethersfield Avenue Grounds. The stadium became known as Clarkin Stadium and was an elite venue of the minor leagues; with a grandstand made of steel and concrete, clubhouses and modern amenities. After fifteen years as owner, Clarkin doubled-down on his Hartford baseball investment. Even though winning was in short supply, he foresaw more opportunity. Along with Providence, Hartford was the most coveted franchise in the Eastern League because of its location, fanbase and facility. However, Hartford’s new stadium was not ready for Opening Day and the Senators played their first two weeks on the road.

Clarkin Stadium produced a higher level of baseball in Hartford. Legendary old-timer and 1884 World Series winner, Arthur Irwin accepted managerial duties and changed the franchise forever. Irwin scouted a 17 year old first baseman from Columbia University. Lou Gehrig was a rookie phenom who played a dozen games for Hartford in 1921. He assumed two different names, “Lefty Gehrig” and “Lou Lewis” presumably in an attempt to retain amateur status on his return to college. Gehrig would be back in Hartford but unfortunately the man who lured him to Connecticut would meet an untimely demise.

Players of the Hartford Senators, 1921.
Lou Gehrig, Hartford Senators, 1921.

On July 16, 1921, Hartford’s ailing manager, Arthur Irwin, jumped from the steamship Calvin Austin on a voyage from New York to Boston and perished. Former Hartford manager Thomas Dowd of the near-championship 1908 club was Irwin’s replacement. Dowd’s recurring role only lasted a month, and the team’s veteran catcher and 3-time World Series champion, Chester “Pinch” Thomas was appointed player-manager by August. One of the top performing Senators of 1921 was outfielder Hinkey Haines, who played a minor role on the New York Yankees during their 1923 World Series championship run.

Thomas J. Dowd, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1921.
Arthur Irwin (left) photographed in 1913.
L to R: James Crowley, Albert House, James Clarkin and Samuel Doty at Clarkin Stadium, 1921.

Near the end of the year, Connie Mack came to Hartford on a scouting trip and purchased Heinie Scheer. The Philadelphia Athletics offered Clarkin $5,000 for Scheer, a sure-handed, fleet of foot infielder. Scheer refused to go to Philadelphia unless Clarkin gave him a percentage of his transfer fee. Following the Senators fifth place finish, owner Clarkin declared his frustration with major league clubs who poached his players without paying higher fees. At the same time, Clarkin would often recruit players from the big leagues himself.

Fred Bailey, Outfielder and Phil Neher, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1921.
Hinkey Haines, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1921.

In 1922, owner Clarkin signed world famous Native American olympian, Jim Thorpe to a brief contract with the Senators. Thorpe crushed Eastern League pitching, and yet his stint in Hartford would only last about six weeks. Upon being traded to Worcester, he criticized Clarkin’s methods which included pressuring Thorpe to hit home runs. A few days after being traded, Thorpe led Worcester to two wins over Hartford and ended up with one of the top batting averages in the Eastern League.

Hartford Courant pictorial of the Hartford Senators, 1922.
Jim Thorpe, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1922.

At the helm of the Senators during the Thorpe fiasco was their 35 year old player-manager Jack Coffey. The club’s left fielder was Leo “Brick” Kane who achieved his third consecutive year with more than 100 Eastern League hits. The team’s right fielder was Sy Rosenthal who began his thirteen year professional career in Hartford. Ted Hauk played third base and was a fixture in Hartford’s lineup. The club failed more often than they succeeded at 73-76, landing in sixth place on the year.

Leo “Brick” Kane, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1922.
1922 Hartford Senators
Jack Coffey, Player-Manager, Hartford Senators, 1922.

In 1923, Hartford’s lone constant, James Clarkin hired a new manager. He signed Paddy O’Connor, a trusted baseball mind and former Senators catcher whose salary exceeded every Eastern League manager. O’Connor was fortunate to welcome back 19 year old Lou Gehrig to Hartford from Columbia University for 59 games. The budding star swatted a league record 24 home runs. All the pieces fell into place as O’Connor, Gehrig and Hartford captured the 1923 pennant. The Senators copped their first Eastern League title with a .640 winning percentage and a 98-55 record.

1923 Harford Senators – Owner James Clarkin (standing, center) and Lou Gehrig (seated, center).
Hartford Senators, Eastern League Champions, 1923.
Paddy O’Connor, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1923.

As champions, the Senators entered the 1924 season teeming with confidence. Lou Gehrig’s game continued to mature as he tore up the Eastern League with 37 homers in 504 at bats and a .369 batting average. Gehrig’s days in Hartford ended when the New York Yankees called him up for 10 games in which he went 6 for 12. Another standout Senator was second baseman Henry “Smudge” Demoe who smacked 184 hits, fifth most in the league. Hartford ended the season in third place, just four games back from the Waterbury Brasscos.

Ted Hauk, Third Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1924.
Carl Schmehl, Utility, Hartford Senators, 1924.
Lou Gehrig, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1924.
Senators Booster Club Membership Card signed by Lou Gehrig, 1924.
Ticket stubs from Hartford Senators game, 1924.
Henry “Smudge” Demoe, Second Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1924.

The next season brought another star player to Hartford. Leo Durocher attended his first tryout with the Senators in early April. Paddy O’Connor trusted Durocher’s defensive talent and quickness at shortstop. As a rookie, Durocher batted just .220 on the season but compiled a .933 fielding percentage. On August 16, 1925, “Leo the Lip” was purchased by the New York Yankees for $12,000. Durocher played 151 games in Hartford and reported to the Yankees at the end of the season.

Leo Durocher (center), Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1925.

Meanwhile, Tom Comiskey and Harry Hesse were finished among the league leaders in hits. Lem Owen and Earl Johnson were reliable starting arms. The heart and soul of the team was their catcher, Eddie Kenna who played 144 games. Marty Shay was the Senators second baseman and leadoff man. Henri Rondeau was a journeyman outfielder born in Danielson, Connecticut, who batted .306. Hartford almost captured the 1925 league title but were outperformed by the Waterbury Brasscos by a game and a half.

Paddy O’Connor, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1925.
Paddy O’Connor shakes hands with Bill McCorry, Manager, Albany, 1925.
Eddie Kenna

In 1926, Clarkin hired former Hartford player and manager Si McDonald to direct the club. The relationship quickly went awry, and McDonald was fired in late May. Second baseman Gene Sheriden was appointed manager. The Senators finished towards the bottom of the standings but there were bright spots on the season. Adolph Schinkle, a pitcher converted into an outfielder, led the Eastern League in doubles and slapped 195 hits. George Brown and John Miller were the club’s best pitchers who ranked among league leaders in earned run average.

Bob Mitchell Hartford Senators, 1926.
George Krahe, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1926.
Tom Comiskey, Hartford Senators, 1926.
Adolph Schinkle, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1926.
“Cowboy” Ken Jones, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1926.
George Kane, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1926.
Gene Sheridan, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1926.
Clifford Knox, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1926.

In 1927, an accidental fire at Clarkin Stadium torched the grandstand. A new grandstand was erected in less than a month. The Senators played at Trinity College and in Manchester while repairs were made. When renovations were completed, President of the Eastern League, Herman Weisman presented Clarkin with a stickpin and cufflinks encrusted with diamonds to honor his diligent efforts. Longtime big leaguer, Kitty Bransfield spent his final season in baseball as Hartford’s manager. First baseman Jim Keesey proved to be a prospect when he led the Eastern League with 204 hits, while Schinkle was second in the league with 203 hits.

Opening Day at Clarkin Stadium, Hartford, 1927.
Kitty Bransfield, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1927.
James H. Clarkin (left) listens to President Herman Weisman (center) of the Eastern League and Mayor Norman Stevens throws ceremonial first pitch at Clarkin Stadium, 1927.

Stationed in Hartford’s outfield was Kiddo Davis who hit for a .349 batting average and later won the 1933 World Series with the New York Giants. Jo-Jo Morrissey, in his second season with the Senators, was key cog in the outfield. An infielder from Cuba named Eusebio González played 25 games with the Senators and was the first player of color since Jim Thorpe. Clarence “Lefty” Thomas was the club’s top performing pitcher, but the rest of the pitching staff struggled mightily and the Senators ended up in sixth place.

Jo-Jo Morrissey, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1927.
Art Butler, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1927.

In the winter of 1928, James H. Clarkin decided to retire from baseball. He brought three pennants to Hartford as owner. Clarkin was a stern, no nonsense businessman who had drawn the ire of some Hartford fans but according to his former manager Jack Coffey, he had “many endearing qualities hidden from those who did not know him intimately.” Subsequently, Clarkin Stadium was renamed Bulkeley Stadium in honor of Morgan G. Bulkeley, a prominent Hartford man, first President of the National League, former U.S. Senator and Governor of Connecticut who passed away in 1922.

James H. Clarkin retires, 1928.
Bulkeley Stadium, Hartford, 1928.
Bulkeley Stadium, Hartford, Connecticut, 1928.

Hartford’s new ownership was spearheaded by Robert J. Farrell, a local real estate developer. The purchase price for the franchise and stadium property was reported to be $200,000. Farrell created a private stock company made up of investors who expanded the grandstand at Bulkeley Stadium. John A. Danaher was hired to be the club’s Secretary and handled most administrative duties. The buyout reinforced the common opinion of the day – that Hartford was a celebrated baseball city. In preparation for the 1928 season, the team rehired the popular Paddy O’Connor as manager.

Robert J. Farrell, President, Hartford Senators, 1928
Board of Directors, Hartford Baseball Club, 1928.
Opening Day batter for the Hartford Senators, 1928.
Mayor Norman Stevens throws first pitch, 1928.
Mayor Norman Stevens (left) and Bob Farrell, Owner, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Paddy O’Connor, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1928.

John “Bunny” Roser was the team’s newest and most valuable hitter, earning the league’s home run title with 27 round-trippers. At second base, Scott Slayback demonstrated a capable bat with 10 homers. A southpaw pitcher named Russ Van Atta threw for a marvelous 2.49 earned run average and before being called up by the New York Yankees. Carl Schmehl and Tom Comiskey played their final seasons in after several years in Hartford, and the club finished third place in the 1928 Eastern League.

William Eisemann, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Skee Watson, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Dominique Paiement, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Pete Stack, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Heine Scheer, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1928.
Jack Levy, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1928.
John Styborski, Pitcher Hartford Senators, 1928.

Going into the 1929 season, the Hartford Senators made a splash in the press when they signed a 2-time World Series champion, Heinie Groh as player-manager. The club then resigned their former second baseman of 1921, Heinie Scheer. Corner outfielder John Roser hit another 25 home runs while his counterpart Bill Hohman mashed 24 long balls. Utility man Skee Watson had a brilliant year at the plate, hitting for .324 average in 593 at bats. Mike Martineck hit .337 and replaced Groh as player-manager in late August.

Heinie Groh and Robert J. Farrell, Hartford Senators, 1929.

The Senators would struggle to pitch effectively throughout the year. Their best hurler was 5’8″ Dan Woodman who threw 236 innings with a 3.74 earned run average and a record of 13 wins and 14 losses. Local pitchers, Sam Hyman and Johnny Michaels also made appearances on the mound. Their starting catcher, Joe Smith had a solid defensive and offensive season. However, individual performances did not result in a successful 1929 campaign. Hartford ended the year in last place, much to the disappointment of fan expectations.

Players of the Hartford Senators, 1929.
Infielders of the Hartford Senators, 1929.
Johnny Roser, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Gary Fortune, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Walter Brown, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Sam Hyman, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Heinie Groh, Third Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Joe Smith, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.
Shep Cannon, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1929.

While the Great Depression began to ravage the nation’s economy, Hartford’s minor league club sought redemption. On May 23, 1930, fans witnessed an exhibition between the Senators and Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics at Bulkeley Stadium. Because of an illness Mack was not present, but Commissioner Landis attended as a guest of Mayor Walter Batterson. Rookie first baseman and future Hall of Fame inductee Hank Greenberg played 17 games for the Senators. Baseball was a welcome spectacle during tough economic times, though Hartford’s season would be cut short. The Hartford club folded on June 30, 1930, due to financial insolvency. New Haven, Pittsfield and Providence also halted operations, reducing the Eastern League to four clubs.

The Hartford Senators with Mayor Batterson and Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, 1930.
Judge Kenesaw Landis and Mayor Walter Batterson, 1930.
Oriental Corella, Second Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Bernie Hewitt, First Baseman and Bill Cooper, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Hank Greenberg, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Tom Mullen, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Raymond J. Utley, Treasurer, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Joe Malay, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1930.
King Bader, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1930.
Skee Watson, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1930.
A view south down Main Street in Hartford, Connecticut, 1930
Bill Hohman, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1930.

By spring of 1931, the Eastern League returned with eight clubs, including Hartford under new ownership. Bob Farrell sold out to the Brooklyn Dodgers organization. Dodgers business manager, Dave Driscoll became president of the Senators from his office in Brooklyn. Driscoll sent Earl Mann to run the affiliated operation as Hartford’s business manager. 27 year old Charles Moore was chosen as player-manager and backup catcher. Paul Richards was the starting catcher, team leader in home runs and later became an inventor (patented the “Iron Mike” pitching machine). Hartford’s best overall hitter was Red Howell, who finished fourth in the league in batting average.

Management of the Hartford Senators, 1931.
Future Players of the Hartford Senators, 1931.
Infielders of the Hartford Senators, 1931.
Earl Mattingly, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Norman Sitts, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Red Howell, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Hartford Courant report by Albert W. Keane, 1931.
Max Rosenfeld, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Bobby Reis, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Hartford Senators visit Camp Courant, 1931.

Hartford demolished the Eastern League in 1931 winning 97 of 137 games. They captured the championship with superior pitching and with eleven players who had big league experience. The Senators received seven Eastern League All-Star selections: Bob Parham, Bobby Reis, Paul Richards, Van Mungo, Earl Mattingly Jr. and Phil Gallivan. Most distinguished among them was Van Mungo who later earned five National League All-Star selections. Johnny Mann and Al Cohen were also major contributors to the team’s pennant run. The 1931 Hartford Senators are recognized as one of the 100 greatest minor league teams of all time.

1931 Hartford Senators
Paul Richards, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Bob Parham, First Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1931.
Al Cohen, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1931.
1931 Hartford Senators

Hartford’s 1932 season began with a ceremonial unfurling of the Eastern League pennant at Bulkeley Stadium. Business manager Earl Mann did the honors and posed for the cameras. Charles Moore was rehired as field manager but when the Dodgers requested that he manage their Jersey City affiliate, Moore obliged. The Senators named shortstop Bill Marlotte player-manager even though their first baseman and captain Norman Sitts was expected to be promoted to the post. Before the managerial move, the Senators were four games back from first place. After Moore left, Hartford sank to the bottom of the standings.

Earl Mann, Business Manager, Hartford Senators unfurls the pennant, 1932.
Charley Moore, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1932.

Honorable mentions on the Senators of 1932 include: Red Howell who batted .349, Bruce Caldwell, a Yale University graduate, Jim Henry, a rookie pitcher and Byron Topol, a little-known third baseman. Veteran players Johnny Mann, Eddie Kenna and Pinky Pittenger would play their final season in Hartford. On July 18, 1932, the Hartford Courant reported the disbanding of the Eastern League due to poor attendance. The league had operated for sixteen consecutive seasons before owners met in New York City to cancel the circuit. Waning interest and widespread economic woes brought on by the Great Depression hampered revenues.

Bill Marlotte
Al Kimbrel, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Roy Humphries, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Phil Gallivan, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Dave Cochlin, Catcher, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Johnny Mann, Utility, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Jim Henry, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1932.
Eddie Kunsberg, Pitcher/First Baseman, Hartford Senators 1932.
Allentown vs. Hartford Senators at Bulkeley Stadium, 1932.

There would be no minor league baseball in Hartford during the year of 1933. Instead, Hartford jeweler Bill Savitt rented Bulkeley Stadium and staged his Savitt Gems baseball team against professional and independent clubs. The Senators restarted operations in the newly formed Northeastern League in 1934. Johnny Roser settled in again as the club’s power-hitter. A 38 year old first baseman named Snake Henry had a brilliant year at the plate. Hartford had talent but they lacked consistency. Three different managers attempted to steer the team but the Senators placed fourth in Hartford’s lone season in the Northeastern League.

Mayor Beach tosses the first pitch at Opening Day, Hartford, 1934.
Lee Kulas, Infielder, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Fred Henry, Player-Manager, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Johnny Roser, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Emil Planeta, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Pepper Rea, Third Baseman, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Jim Clark, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Bob Walsh, Pitcher, Hartford Senators, 1934.
Dr. Edward Baker, Shortstop, Hartford Senators, 1934.

Sources

  1. Hartford Courant database on Newspapers.com
  2. SABR Bio Project – Danny Murphy
  3. SABR Bio Project – Lou Gehrig
  4. Statscrew.com

Lou Gehrig Used Fake Name as a Rookie on the Hartford Senators

This article was written by Norton Chellgren and published in the 1975 Baseball Research Journal

On April 5, 1921, the Hartford Senators of the Eastern League in their first exhibition game of the season beat Columbia University 4-3. The big story was a Columbia player, Lefty Gehrig, who hit Hartford pitcher Alton Durgin for two long home runs in his only two trips to the plate. A. B. McGinley of the Hartford Times described the second home run like this: “When he came up again in the 3rd inning, Durgin the lofty Maine boy who was pitching for Hartford was all set for revenge. He got a strike on Gehrig but the next one he threw Gehrig leaned on and it went sailing out of the enclosure past a big sundial and almost into the School of Mines. It was a mighty clout and worthy of Babe Ruth’s best handiwork.”

Lou Gehrig, First Baseman, Columbia University, 1922.

The young player greatly impressed Hartford Manager, Arthur Irwin, a former major league player and manager. The two home runs would have cleared the center field fence at Clarkin Stadium, Hartford’s home park, and Irwin saw a promising future for the young baseball player.

Clarkin Stadium, Hartford, Connecticut, 1921.

The big first baseman, it was later reported, had promised Irwin that he would play under him if he decided to enter professional baseball. Several big league teams had been trying to sign him but all indications were he would stay at Columbia University. Subsequently, on June 2, announcement was made by Manager Irwin in the local newspapers that the hard hitting semi-pro from Brooklyn, Lefty Gehrig, had been signed to play first base for the Senators. It was assumed by some that he had decided to quit school.

Arthur Irwin, Manager, Hartford Senators, 1921.

The next day the newspapers were apparently requested or advised not to call further attention to the Columbia athlete’s real name and from that day on they referred only to that young player from New York, “Lewis” or “Lou Lewis.” On June 3 (1921) the Hartford Senators beat the Pittsfield Hillies 2-1. Lou Lewis played the full game at first base. In his O. B. debut, he was 0 for 3 with one sacrifice hit against Pittsfield hurler Al Pierotti, who later went up to the Braves.

Lou Gehrig batting for Columbia University, 1921.

After that initial game the Hartford Courant wrote “Lou Lewis, Arthur Irwin’s latest discovery was planted on the initial sack. The youngster who is only 18 years old (actually he was still 17) appeared to be a bit nervous. After he gets used to surroundings he may develop. They seldom fail to make the grade with Irwin teaching the ways of baseball.”

Lewis’ first hit and first run scored came in his second game as Hartford beat the Waterbury Brasscos 5-3 at Hartford before 5,000 fans on June 4. In the second inning the youthful first sacker hit the first ball pitched by Fred Rawley to right field for three bases. He scored shortly after when the next batter Phil Neher singled to center. On the following day, June 5, Lewis went two for five as Hartford beat Albany 10-2 at Albany; the first baseman was beginning to impress and was being touted as a “Babe Ruth.”

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1922
Lou Gehrig, Punter, Columbia University, 1922.

Hartford beat Pittsfield 10-6 on June 8, and the Times wrote: “Lewis caught hold of a fast one in the third inning and sent it against the “B” in the Buick sign on the right field fence for a double. Lewis probably won’t get a Buick for his clout but he may get a ride in one before the season runs its course.” Lou went two for five that day. One of the times he made an out he slammed a terrific drive that traveled at the proverbial mile-a-minute clip into right fielder Bill McCorry’s gloved hand. It was described as the hardest hit of the game.

Hartford Courant excerpt, June 8, 1921.

While Lewis at the young age of 17 was demonstrating his ability to knock the cover off the ball there were some indications that he lacked experience. On June 10 the Senators were trailing the Bridgeport “Brown Derbies” in the last of the ninth when with one out Heinie Scheer singled. Lewis then hit one to the box carrying a lot of smoke and it bounded off pitcher Ed Lepard’s glove for a single. Lewis a moment later was trapped off first by catcher Joe Smith on a pitchout. The rally was effectively stopped and the game was lost by Hartford, 4 to 2.

The Times wrote on June 11, “Lewis the youngster just breaking into organized ball with the local club is doing as well as one can expect and his present work gives fans here hopes that he will add to the Hartford hitting average which at present is the weakest link in the pennant-winning chain. The young first sacker is a slugger.” Lefty Lewis unexplainedly did not play in the Bridgeport game on June 13 but the next day against the Springfield Ponies he hit the second triple of his early professional experience.

In his last Eastern League game that year, on June 15, 1921, against Springfield, he showed his power even though his only hit was an infield one. In the first inning he crashed one against third baseman Jack Flynn’s shins and the ball caromed off with such force that it bounced across the diamond and the runner on third base, Harry Hesse, scored without any trouble.

Lou Gehrig “Lewis” plays his last game of 1921.
Harry Hesse, Hartford Senators, 1922.

No game was played on June 16 and at that point the young first baseman’s name, without explanation, ceased to appear in the Hartford papers for the remainder of the season. During his stay Hartford, winning 8 games and losing 5, had climbed into first place with a 28-17 record. Before the season was to end the Hartford Senators would drop to fifth place and its Manager, Art Irwin who had been successful in luring the young first baseman into professional baseball, if only for a short 12 games, would meet an untimely death. On July 16, 1921, he fell or jumped from the steamer Calvin Austin during a voyage from New York to Boston.

Lou Gehrig, Hartford Senators, 1923.

Even with a mediocre batting average of .261, Lewis had given Hartford fans an indication of things to come. The name “Lou Lewis” would not again appear in a Hartford or other professional baseball game box score! “Lou,” however, would return to the Eastern League in 1923 (as of August 2) and hit home runs at a pace which still has not been surpassed in the Eastern League, 24 home runs in only 59 games.

1923 Hartford Senators

What the Hartford newspapers did not report was that Columbia athletic officials had learned that Gehrig was playing pro ball under an assumed name. After being advised of the possible implications of playing for money, an unhappy Lou Gehrig returned promptly to New York City. As a result of this escapade Lou had to wait an extra year, until the fall of 1922, before he could participate in Columbia inter-collegiate sports. The experience might have hurt the New York Giants as well because had it never taken place, who knows, McGraw might have been able to sign up Lou Gehrig in 1923 instead.

Lou Gehrig and Mayor Norman Stevens of Hartford, 1924.

Source: Chellgren, Norton. “The Short Career of Lou Lewis.” Society for American Baseball Research, 1975 Baseball Research Journal, 1975, sabr.org/journal/article/the-short-career-of-lou-lewis.

Bulkeley Stadium, Gone But Not Forgotten

Morgan G. Bulkeley Stadium

Former names: Clarkin Stadium (1921-1927) and Wethersfield Avenue Grounds (1901-1927)
Location: Hanmer Street & George Street, off Franklin Avenue Hartford, Connecticut
Capacity: 12,500
Opened: 1928
Demolished: 1955
Tenants: Hartford Baseball Club (1902-1932, 1934), 1938-1945), Hartford Blues Football Club (1925-1927), Savitt Gems (1932-1945) and Hartford Chiefs (1946-1952)

Morgan Gardner Bulkeley, 1911.

Morgan G. Bulkeley Stadium was a sporting event venue in Hartford, Connecticut, best known as the location of Babe Ruth’s final ballgame. Bulkeley Stadium was home to the Hartford Baseball Club a minor league team nicknamed the Senators, then the Bees and later the Chiefs. Major league stars and the “who’s who” of baseball often made exhibition game appearances at the stadium.

Bulkeley Stadium, Hartford, Connecticut, 1928.

Semi-professional teams such as the Hartford Poli’s, the Savitt Gems and the Hartford Indians frequently used the facility. During baseball’s off-season, the Hartford Blues of the National Football League, nationally sanctioned boxing matches, motor sports, and artistic performances were popular stadium attractions. Initially constructed in 1921, the stadium was renamed to honor former Connecticut Governor and First President of the National League, Morgan Gardner Bulkeley in 1928.

Map of baseball venues throughout Hartford’s history, 2004.

A block to the east of Bulkeley Stadium was the ballpark’s original site; Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, also referred to as Hartford Baseball Park, the Hartford Base Ball Grounds, or simply the Hartford Grounds. Each of these names were used interchangeably. In March of 1896, Manager William Barnie of the Hartford Baseball Club constructed a grandstand on the south side of the city measuring 150 feet wide and 20 feet tall. In December of 1905, James H. Clarkin purchased the Hartford Senators and leased the Wethersfield Avenue Grounds. At the time, the diamond was “regarded as the finest in this section of the country.”¹

Barnie secures Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, 1896.
Hartford Ball Park, Wethersfield Avenue, 1896.
Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, Hartford, Connecticut, 1908.

Hundreds of ball games were played on the site by amateur, semi-professional and professional teams each summer. The baseball facility underwent improvements and renovations on several occasions; the first of which was completed in spring of 1910. Manager Bob Connery of the Hartford Senators in the Connecticut State League was reported to be pleased with ballpark’s improvements in the April 9, 1910 edition of the Hartford Courant. A ticket office was built, a food stand doubled in size and carpeting was installed in the clubhouse.

William Moore, Hartford Groundskeeper, 1910.
New Haven vs. Hartford at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, 1912.
Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, 1912.
Benny Kauff, Outfielder, Hartford Senators, 1913.
Hartford Senators and Judge Kenesaw Landis at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, 1916.

Wethersfield Avenue Grounds became a destination for the game’s biggest names. In the summer of 1916, the infamous Ty Cobb delighted a small crowd of 800 Hartford fans. Cobb guest starred for the visiting New Haven Colonials as first baseman and relief pitcher versus the Hartford Poli’s, the city’s semi-professional club. Alongside Cobb on the Colonials was Torrington High School alumnus and Philadelphia Athletics player Joe Dugan who played shortstop. The Colonials beat the Poli’s 7 to 0. Cobb would visit Hartford again in 1918, though this bit of history would be overshadowed by another famed slugger.

Ty Cobb plays in Hartford, 1916.

In 1918 and 1919 the one and only Babe Ruth played at the Wethersfield Avenue Grounds as part of his perennial barnstorming tours. Days after winning the World Series with Boston Red Sox, Ruth made his first appearance in Hartford on September 16, 1918, to play for the Hartford Poli’s. Ruth pitched the Poli’s to a 1-0 victory versus the Fisk Red Tops. He hurled a complete game shutout, allowing only 4 hits. Ruth hit third of the batting order, recording a single and double. Ruth drew a crowd of about 5,000 spectators and earned a reported $350 for his appearance.

Babe Ruth plays at Wethersfield Avenue Grounds, 1918.

In 1921, owner of the Hartford Senators, James H. Clarkin built a new baseball venue a block to the west of the old Wethersfield Avenue Grounds. The site was located at the intersection of Hanmer Street and George Street off of Franklin Avenue in South Hartford. A large grandstand made of steel and concrete wrapped around the field from foul pole to foul pole. Locker rooms below the stands were equipped with showers, baths, and telephones. The facility was dubbed Clarkin Stadium and garnered a reputation as one of New England’s best ballparks.

Clarkin Stadium, 1921.
Clarkin Stadium blueprint, 1921.
Clarkin Stadium, 1921.
Hartford Police defeat Waterbury Police at Clarkin Stadium, 1921.
Clarkin Stadium, 1921.

Clarkin Stadium hosted Hall of Fame slugger Lou Gehrig who began his career with the Hartford Senators of the Eastern League in 1921, 1923 and 1924. Famous Native American olympian athlete, Jim Thorpe appeared in Hartford’s lineup near the end of his career. Leo Durocher, Jo-Jo Morrissey, Kiddo Davis, and Pete Appleton were also Senators at this time. In 1927, an accidental fire severely damaged the grandstand at Clarkin Stadium. Though it was rebuilt two months later, the Hartford Senators played their games on the road until mid-July.

Hartford Senators with Lou Gehrig (seated, center) at Clarkin Stadium, 1923.
Lou Gehrig at Clarkin Stadium, 1923.
Opening Day at Clarkin Stadium, 1925.
Hartford Blues Football, 1926.
Hartford Senators Opening Day, 1927.
James H. Clarkin, 1928.

In January of 1928, Clarkin sold his stadium as well as Hartford’s minor league franchise. Both were purchased for over $200,000 by a group of private investors led by Robert J. Farrell, a real estate and insurance agent and longtime business manager for the Senators. Hartford continued their play in the Eastern League under Farrell’s direction. Clarkin Stadium was renamed Bulkeley Stadium to honor Morgan G. Bulkeley who had passed away six years prior. Existing wood bleachers were replaced by steel seating throughout the grandstand.

Stadium seating at Bulkeley Stadium, 1928.
William Eisemann, Catcher, Hartford Senators at Bulkeley Stadium, 1928.
Bulkeley Stadium Mayor Norman Stevens and Bob Farrell, 1928.
Pittsburgh Pirates at Bulkeley Stadium, 1928.
Bulkeley Stadium boxing, Bat Battalino v.s. Eddie Lord, 1929.

Baseball Hall of Fame inductee, Hank Greenberg played for the 1930 Hartford Senators at Bulkeley Stadium with King Bader as manager. President Robert J. Farrell died at age 32 of acute appendicitis. During the depths of the Great Depression, the Senators were purchased by and became the affiliates of the Brooklyn Dodgers organization. The Senators went on to win the 1931 Eastern League championship behind the bats of Red Howell, Al Cohen and Bobby Reis. When the Eastern League disbanded at the midpoint of the 1932 season, Bulkeley Stadium and the City of Hartford were without a headlining baseball club.

Hartford Senators and Judge Kenesaw Landis, 1930.
Hartford Courant reporters play game at Bulkeley Stadium, 1930.
Hartford vs. New Haven at Bulkeley Stadium, 1931.
Hartford vs. Allentown at Bulkeley Stadium, 1932.

Shortly thereafter a semi-professional club called the Savitt Gems stepped in as tenants of Bulkeley Stadium in July of 1932. They were backed by local jeweler and baseball promoter Bill Savitt who first created the Gems in 1930 as part of the Hartford Twilight League. With Bulkeley Stadium as home base, the Gems made the leap from amateur to semi-professional. From 1932 to 1945, Savitt and his Gems welcomed countless big leaguers as guest stars in Hartford, including: Babe Ruth, Cy Young, Ted Williams, Honus Wagner, Lloyd Waner, Dizzy Dean, Jimmie Foxx, Jim Thorpe, Chief Bender, Josh Gibson, Martin Dihigo, Satchel Paige, Johnny Taylor, Johnny Mize, Bill McKechnie, Moose Swaney and Monk Dubiel.

Bulkeley Stadium, 1932.
1932 Savitt Gems at Bulkeley Stadium.
Savitt leases Bulkeley Stadium, 1932.
Savitt Gems vs. New Britain Falcons at Bulkeley Stadium, 1932.
Bulkeley Stadium Official Scorecard, 1932.
Jimmy Foxx at Bulkeley Stadium, 1933.

Savitt Gems vs. Pittsburgh Pirates, 1933.
Johnny Taylor pitches for the Savitt Gems at Bulkeley Stadium, 1934.
Motorcycle racing at Bulkeley Stadium, 1935.
Bulkeley Stadium, 1936.
1936 Savitt Gems at Bulkeley Stadium.
Dizzy Dean at Bulkeley Stadium, 1936.
Savitt Gems vs. Cleveland Indians, 1937.

In 1938, the Boston Bees of the National League returned minor league baseball to Hartford. Boston purchased the Hartford Senators and leased Bulkeley Stadium. The club was referred to as the Hartford Senators and the Hartford Bees (and Hartford Laurels). During the 1942 season, Del Bissonette served as player-manager while eventual Hall of Fame pitcher, Warren Spahn earned 17 wins and 12 losses. A few years later, Hartford won the 1944 Eastern League pennant due to pitching by Hal Schacker as well as hometown hero and former Savitt Gems ace, Pete Naktenis.

Charlie Blossifield and the Hartford Bees move into Bulkeley Stadium, 1938.
Al Schacht at Bulkeley Stadium, 1938.
Hartford Bees at Bulkeley Stadium, 1938.
Gene Handley, Hartford Bees, 1939.
1939 Hartford Bees at Bulkeley Stadium.
Bulkeley Stadium, 1940.
Bulkeley Stadium, 1940.
Hartford vs. Springfield at Bulkeley Stadium, 1940.
Governor Hurley on Opening Day at Bulkeley Stadium, 1941.
The Eastern League’s Hartford Baseball Club at Bulkeley Stadium, 1942.
Ted Williams plays at Bulkeley Stadium, 1942.
Bob Brady, Catcher, Hartford Bees, 1944.
Hartford vs. Williamsport at Bulkeley Stadium, 1944.
1944 Hartford Baseball Club at Bulkeley Stadium.

On September 30, 1945, Babe Ruth returned to Hartford to play in a charity game at Bulkeley Stadium as a member of the Savitt Gems. At 50 years old, Ruth drew a crowd of more than 2,500. He took batting practice before the game and clouted a home run over Bulkeley Stadium’s right field fence. During the exhibition, Ruth coached first base. He later entered the game as a pinch-hitter and grounded out to the pitcher. The ballgame was Ruth’s final appearance of his playing career. Ruth passed away less than 3 years later at the age of 53.

Babe Ruth plays for Savitt Gems at Bulkeley Stadium, 1945.
Bill Savitt and Babe Ruth at Bulkeley Stadium, 1945.
Babe Ruth plays his last ball game on the Savitt Gems at Bulkeley Stadium, 1945.

In 1946, Hartford’s minor league franchise changed their name to the Hartford Chiefs as a result of their major league affiliate, reverting their official name back to the Boston Braves. Players Gene Conley, George Crowe, Frank Torre and local Wethersfield native, Bob Repass were standouts for the Hartford Chiefs at Bulkeley Stadium. When the Boston Braves moved to Milwaukee after the 1952 season, the Hartford Chiefs of the Eastern League were also relocated.

Hartford Chiefs program, 1946.
Warren Spahn, Boston Braves (lef) at Bulkeley Stadium, 1947.
Hartford Chiefs vs. Trinity College at Bulkeley Stadium, 1947.
Hartford Chiefs vs. Wilkes-Barre at Bulkeley Stadium, 1947.
Hartford Fire Department at Bulkeley Stadium, 1948.
Boston Braves vs. Trinity College Bulkeley Stadium, 1948.
Johnny Taylor, Hartford Chiefs at Bulkeley Stadium, 1949.
Hartford Courant All-Stars at Bulkeley Stadium, 1949.
Boston Braves vs. Boston Braves at Bulkeley Stadium, 1949.
1950 Hartford Chiefs at Bulkeley Stadium.
Hugh Casey, Brooklyn Dodgers at Bulkeley Stadium, 1950.
Major League All-Stars vs. Hartford Indians, 1950.
Johnny Mize and Gene Woodling, New York Yankees at Bulkeley Stadium, 1950.
Anguish over Gene Conley Bulkeley Stadium, 1951.
Gene Conley, Hartford Chiefs at Bulkeley Stadium, 1951.
Tommy Holmes, Manager, Hartford Chiefs teaches clinic at Bulkeley Stadium, 1951.
1951 Hartford Laurelettes
Len Pearson, Hartford Chiefs, 1951.
Connie Mack at Bulkeley Stadium, 1951.
Owner Charles Blossfield, 1951.
Hartford Chiefs Program, 1952.
Trinity College at Bulkeley Stadium, 1952.
Eddie Matthews at Bulkeley Stadium, 1952.
Boxing at Bulkeley Stadium, 1953.
St. Louis Browns at Bulkeley Stadium, 1953.
Jim Piersall and Joey Jay, at Bulkeley Stadium 1953.

In 1955, the stadium was sold by the Milwaukee Braves to John E. Hays Realty of Hartford for $50,000. A shopping center is planned for the site but it never materialized. Bulkeley Stadium fell into disarray and was demolished. The property became a nursing home named Ellis Manor. A stone monument and home plate was dedicated in 1998 to remember the decades of memories at Bulkeley Stadium. Another commemorative ceremony was held at the site in 2013.

Bulkeley Stadium Monument Dedication, 1998.

Bulkeley Commemoration Ceremony, 2013.

“On the baseball field at Bulkeley Stadium, Leo Durocher played his first season of professional baseball. On the same diamond, Lou Gehrig, learned the rudiments of first base play and went directly from there to Yankee Stadium and baseball immortality. Hank Greenberg was a raw rookie who couldn’t make the grade here and had to be shipped down to Evansville. The greatest athlete of all time, Jim Thorpe, wore the Hartford uniform in one of the most bizzare periods of the city’s baseball history. Paul Richards was a Hartford catcher there and Van Lingle Mungo, a Hartford pitcher. Babe Ruth and Ted Williams played at Bulkeley Stadium when Bill Savitt was keeping the place alive. A man could go down Franklin Avenue to Bulkeley Stadium and see young ball players who were going to be the very best in the majors.

Bill Lee, Sports Editor, Hartford Courant, July 9, 1955.
Ellis Manor on site of Bulkeley Stadium, 2014.

References

  1.  The Hartford Courant
  2. “Bulkeley Stadium: Hartford’s last home to pro baseball”. SABR. Retrieved 2016-01-24.

External Links