Author: GHTBL

August 2 – Crush Cancer Night at Dunkin’ Donuts Park

On Monday, August 2, 2021, the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League will host a doubleheader at at Dunkin Donuts Park in Hartford. The event, presented by Cigna, will be the league’s 5th annual charity series. This year, ticket proceeds will be donated to Connecticut Cancer Foundation and the Brian Peer Memorial Scholarship.

  • 6:00 PM, People’s United Bank vs. Bristol Greeners
  • 8:00 PM, East Hartford Jets vs. Hartford Colts

Tickets will be available at the Main Gate for $10 per adult and free for kids 14 and under.

RSVP on Facebook at https://fb.me/e/2rXIzjCCg.

Can’t attend? Donate here: givebutter.com/embed/c/ghtbl.


About Connecticut Cancer Foundation

Connecticut Cancer Foundation was founded in 1987 by Connecticut native John C. Ellis, a former catcher for the New York Yankees, who played Major League Baseball for 13 years. John lost his sister, brother and sister-in-law to lymphoma. He is a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma that was diagnosed before John reached 40.  Fortunately, John survived and CCF was born with the idea of raising funds through sports with the help of sports celebrities. CCF has flourished under the guidance of John’s wife, Jane G. Ellis, President and Executive Director of CCF.

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John and Jane Ellis, Founders of Connecticut Cancer Foundation.

Through the CT Cancer Patient Assistance Program, CCF helps Connecticut families requesting assistance through referrals from oncology social workers from hospitals, cancer treatment centers and hospices throughout the state. For the past 34 years, CCF has quietly granted over $6.4 million to more than 7,000 Connecticut families dealing with the financial hardship that often follows a cancer diagnosis. In addition, the Foundation has donated over $2.4 million to support ongoing cancer research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.


About the Brian Peer Memorial Scholarship

This college scholarship is in memory of Brian Peer of Windsor, Connecticut. He was a Windsor High School varsity baseball player from 1996 until 1998, earning All-Conference honors as a senior. He also played American Legion Baseball in Windsor earning All-Zone Honors in 1998. He continued on to Manchester Community College earning All-New England Junior College All Star recognition then on to Rhode Island College, being named Co-Captain his Senior Year. He continued to play in area adult leagues through 2018. The scholarship is awarded each year to a Windsor High School baseball player who will be attending college.

Brian Peer played in the GHTBL from 2004 to 2018 and is remembered as a good teammate and team leader.

GHTBL Gives Back to the Greater Hartford Community

On Sunday, July, 9, 2017 the GHTBL hosted the first ever charity series at Dunkin’ Donuts Park. Four games were played and $5,641 in ticket proceeds were donated to Hartford’s Camp Courant. On June 21 and 22 of 2018 the league hosted a pair of doubleheaders that raised $4,500 for Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. In 2019, the Twilight League held another day at Dunkin’ Donuts Park and raised $7,000 for a Multiple Sclerosis charity named MS4MS. Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, the league managed to play a shortened season in 2020, including a doubleheader at Dunkin’ Donuts Park that raised $2,000 for the new Johnny Taylor Field in Hartford’s Colt Park.

Camp Courant Kids Day at Dunkin’ Donuts Park, 2017

August 7 to 16 – 2021 Playoff Tournament

On August 7, 2021, the Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League will begin our postseason at Palmer Field in Middletown, Connecticut. Consolation bracket games will start August 8, 2021 at McKenna Field in East Hartford, Connecticut. Our annual double-elimination playoff tournament will conclude at McKenna Field as shown below:



Admission: $10 per person for a ticket to the entire tournament. Free for kids 14 and under.

Stay tuned for weather-related postponements and announcements at www.GHTBL.org.

August 20 – GHTBL All-Stars vs. CTL All-Stars

Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League and Connecticut Twilight League will play a postseason interleague All-Star game at 7 PM on Friday, August 20, 2021.

This year, GHTBL will host the exhibition at McKenna Field on Remington Road in East Hartford, Connecticut. The 9-inning game will mark the sixth contest between GHTBL and CTL in which GHTBL has remained undefeated.

Aside from several rainouts, both league’s regular seasons are going as planned. After a champions are crowned, managers will decide on all-star selections. These all-star matchups allow each league to showcase many of our best players. Participants, parents and fans are welcomed to attend the exhibition at no charge.

As always, we thank you for your continued support.

We will see you at the ballpark! Free admission!

August 22 – All-Star Game at Dodd Stadium

The Greater Hartford Twilight Baseball League is pleased announce a new event this summer at Dodd Stadium in Norwich, Connecticut.

On August 22, 2021, the GHTBL All-Stars will match up with an All-Star team from the George Donnelly Sunset League out of Narragansett and Newport, Rhode Island. The game will be the first matchup between the two leagues after nearly a century as active organizations.

The Sunset League was established in 1919 and along with the GHTBL, it is one of the oldest baseball leagues in America.

The game will begin at 4 PM at Dodd Stadium. Free admission.

Visit the GDSL website: https://www.gdsunsetleague.com/

September 19 – 4th Annual Buzzy Levin Golf Tournament

  • Sunday, September 19, 2020 at Blackledge Country Club, 180 West Street, Hebron (map)
  • 12:00 PM – Lunch and Check-in
  • 1:00 PM – Shotgun Tee-off
  • 5:30 PM – Dinner and Awards Banquet
  • $125 per golfer
  • $450 per foursome
  • $30 for dinner only
  • $100 for Tee Sign sponsorship

DOWNLOAD REGISTRATION & SPONSORSHIP FORM

https://fb.me/e/PX0a2EFW

Alex Cornell is Lighting Up the Pecos League

Alex Cornell is currently wrecking Pecos League pitching with a .500 batting average. He’s mashed 27 base hits in 54 at bats with two home runs and 14 RBI for the Bakersfield Train Robbers.

Cornell, who hails from Columbia, Connecticut, is in his rookie Pecos League season. He finished up his college career this past spring at Limestone University in Gaffney, South Carolina. As a utility player for the Saints, he hit .386 with 8 home runs and 36 RBI and was 2021 All-South Atlantic Conference Honorable Mention. In the summer of 2018, he played under player-manager, Charlie Hesseltine of the Record-Journal Expos.

Cornell played all four years at E.O. Smith High School where he became the first player in program history to be named All-State as a junior. He posted a .410 batting average with five home runs, led the state in doubles and guided the Panthers to a conference championship. He was named team captain as a senior and batted .400 with seven home runs while earning All-Conference honors.

The GHTBL wishes Alex all the best on his bright future in professional baseball.

Alex Cornell, Bakersfield Train Robbers, Pecos League, 2021.

“The Pecos League is an independent baseball league which operates in cities in desert mountain regions throughout California, New Mexico, Southern Arizona, Kansas, West Texas and Colorado. Pecos Teams play in cities that do not have Major or Minor League Baseball teams and is not affiliated with either. The Pecos League has two divisions which stretch from the plains of Kansas to the Oceans of California to the Mexican Border of Texas. The two divisions with the Mountain Division and the Pacific Division.”

From the Pecos League website, www.pecosleague.com.

Tight Race in the Twi-Loop

Last night Jack Blake homered for the East Hartford Jets beating People’s United Bank 7-2. Cole Lalli earned his third win and the Jets moved to 5 and 1 on the year.

Having completed one third of the 2021 GHTBL Regular Season, the frontrunning East Hartford Jets and Vernon Orioles lead the standings.

The season title is very much up for grabs now that the Orioles have hit a 2-game skid. Meanwhile, Rainbow Graphics and South Windsor Phillies are lurking in a tie for third place.

Other honorable mention teams are Ulbrich Steel and Malloves Jewelers. So far shortstop, Sam DeMaio of Steel leads the league in hits and triples. Mike Munson has three homers for the Jewelers.

For all league wide statistics, go to GHTBL.org/stats.

Neifi Mercedes Signs Professional Contract

Recently, Neifi Mercedes signed a professional contract to play for the Eastside Diamond Hoppers of the United Shore Professional Baseball League. Mercedes, 22, hails from New Britain and and he attended Monroe College in the Bronx. In 2018 and 2020, he was the former shortstop of Tom Abbruzzese’s People’s United Bank franchise. Mercedes joins a long list of GHTBL players who have been picked up by an independent league. Also of note: Neifi’s 27 year old brother, Yermin Mercedes is currently having a breakout season as catcher of the Chicago White Sox.

Visit the United Shore Professional Baseball League here at https://uspbl.com.

When the Washington Senators Came to Hartford

On September 23, 1930, the Washington Senators stepped off the train at Hartford’s Union Station. The Senators were on their way to play the Boston Red Sox in a four game series but not before making a stop in Hartford. The team was led by Hall of Fame inductee, Walter Johnson who had become manager after twenty years as Washington’s consummate pitching ace. The club rested up at Hotel Garde that Tuesday morning before their afternoon game at Bulkeley Stadium.

Opposing the Senators was a team comprised of Eastern League All-Stars. The minor league team was led by player-manager, Billy Gleason, a veteran second basemen from the Springfield club. Gleason invited his teammate Bill “Whitey” Dreesen, the Eastern League leader in hits to Hartford. Other players in the Eastern League lineup included corner outfielder John “Bunny” Roser and pitcher Fred “Cy” Waterman.

Main Street, Hartford, Connecticut, looking south, 1930.

Local sporting goods store owner and the founder of the Hartford Twilight League, Harry N. Anderson was responsible for scheduling the game. Anderson made arrangements with Washington’s owner Clark Griffith. Prices were 75 cents for grandstand seating, 50 cents for bleachers and 25 cents for children. Ticket proceeds would be donated to the Hartford Chapter of Disabled American Veterans. Famous showmen Al Schacht and Nick Altrock were also on hand to perform comedy routines between innings.

However, well-known names and newspaper publicity only brought 800 fans to the stadium. Tuesday afternoon was not a convenient time for fans, and there were economic reasons for the low attendance. Hartford, like most places in America at that time, were in the grips of the Great Depression. When poverty and unemployment skyrocketed, benefit games featuring baseball stars were popular events, but unaffordable for many.

Hartford Courant excerpt, September 21, 1930.

Longtime Hartford umpires, Walter Elliot and John “Boggy” Muldoon worked the exhibition at Bulkeley Stadium. First pitch was set for 4:15 PM. In the heart of the batting order for Washington were: right fielder Sam Rice, left fielder Heinie Manush and shortstop Joe Cronin (all of which later inducted into the Hall of Fame). The Senators were one of the most revered hitting clubs in all of baseball.

Although it was the minor leaguers who took an early lead. Whitey Dreesen connected for a grand slam in the fourth inning. The game only lasted eight innings to allow the Senators to catch a train to Boston. Neil Dougherty and Billy Gleason each had two knocks on the day. The Eastern Leaguers won the game 9-8 thanks to a smoky RBI single by Jonathan “Mandy” Brooks.

Unfortunately, Walter Johnson did not make an appearance at the game. The reason for his absence remains unknown. Perhaps Johnson was sick or maybe he was focused on Washington’s remaining American League schedule. By the end of September, the Washington Senators had finished second in the American League with 94 wins and 60 losses, eight games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

Bulkeley Stadium, Hartford, Connecticut, 1931.

Source: Hartford Courant database on Newspapers.com.

Umpire Charlie Daniels, Baseball Pioneer from Hartford

Charles F. Daniels was born in Colchester, Connecticut, on March 13, 1849. He moved to Hartford as a young adult and became a pitcher for the Hartford Amateurs, a club comprised of the city’s best talent. However, the 25 year old Daniels discovered his place to be behind the plate. He began his umpiring career in Hartford officiating minor league, college and amateur games.His professional debut on September 7, 1874, was in a National Association matchup between Hartford and Brooklyn.

Daniels was reported in the newspaper as “Umpire Daniels of Hartford Amateurs.” He would go on to serve 13 seasons as a highly regarded figure in the National Association (1874-1875), the National League (1876, 1878-1880, 1887-1888), and the American Association (1883-1885, 1889). In the early days of professional baseball, Daniels was a top rated umpire. He was popular with most players and fans. He presided over multiple historically significant games. He called two no-hitters; the first in major league history, and the other a perfect game. In 1875, Daniels officially umpired 22 games, all but one as the lone arbiter on the field.

Charles F. Daniels, Umpire of 1888 World Series.

Around midseason, Daniels had a personal dispute with bar owner Matthew M. Coughlin. He once used to work as a barkeeper at Coughlin’s bar on Front Street and rumors spread about Daniels having an affair with Coughlin’s wife. After returning from umpiring a game in New York, Daniels was threatened and chased around downtown Hartford by an enraged Coughlin. In response, Daniels drew a weapon and fired three times in Coughlin’s direction but missed. Daniels was charged for assault with intent to kill but later proven innocent on the grounds of self-defense.

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1875.

When the American Association dissolved in 1876, Daniels latched onto the newly formed National League. That season he called 45 games. Daniels supervised the first no-hitter recognized by Major League Baseball: George Bradley of St. Louis Brown Stockings blanked the Hartford Dark Blues, 2-0 on July 15, 1876. Because he adjudicated so many important big league games as compared to his peers, Daniels became a trusted judge of the game. He earned a reputation as a pioneer of the umpiring craft and his services were in demand.

Daniels was the first umpire to run from home plate to another base to get a better angle on close call. He revolutionized the role of umpire by setting new norms. He was one of the first umpires to wear protective equipment such as shin guards. His expertise was known throughout baseball circles and by the end of 1876, Daniels was summoned to preside over a championship series between Chicago and St. Louis. A special train was sent to collect Daniels and deliver him to St. Louis where he earned $400 with travel expenses paid.

Daniels did not appear as umpire on the major league level in 1877. He then umpired 9 games in 1878 and another 46 games in 1879. He called 28 games in 1880, including the second perfect game in major league history by John Montgomery Ward. Daniels did not umpire once again during 1881 or 1882. He returned for the 1883 season with the American Association, often earning $10 per game.

His game totals increased significantly in the next few years. Daniels umpired 91 games in 1884 and stayed with the American Association until 1885. While in the midst of a famous umpiring career, Daniels opted for a change of roles. In 1886 and 1887, he became manager of the Hartford Base Ball Club in the Eastern League. During this time, Daniels was credited with scouting a young catcher named Connie Mack but later sold him to Washington.

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1890.

In 1888, Daniels resumed umpiring and compiled a career high of 110 games. During his final season as a professional umpire in 1889, he officiated 19 contests for the American Association. His career totals equaled 504 games over 13 seasons. Without official baseball duties, Daniels seemed to lose hope. He suffered from a serious case of alcoholism and in 1890, Daniels checked into the Hartford Retreat and made a recovery. In 1897, Daniels made a comeback as Hartford’s alternate umpire in the Atlantic League.

Hartford Courant excerpt, 1896.
Hartford Courant excerpt, 1896.

At the time of the 1930 U.S. Census, Daniels was living in a rented home on Parham Road in Colchester with his brother Robert. His occupation was noted as a farmer. Then he moved in with his brother Eugene on a farm in Colchester off of New London-Hartford Road. On March 21, 1932, Daniels was found lying unconscious in a ditch where he had apparently fallen during a snowstorm. A head wound and exposure to the elements resulted in his death two days later. Umpire Charlie Daniels died at Backus Hospital in Norwich, Connecticut, at the age of 83.

Hartford Courant column about Umpire Daniels, 1923.

“Don’t spring a book of rules on me and expose your ignorance. You know you can’t read.”

Umpire Charlie Daniels to Kid Gleason in 1894.
Gravestone of Charles F. Daniels in Linwood Cemetery, Colchester, Connecticut.

Sources
1. Hartford Courant Database accessed on Newspapers.com
2. Baseball-Reference.com